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Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. Mutation detection is complex due to the large size of the NF1 gene, the presence of pseudogenes and the great variety of possible lesions. Although there is no evidence for locus heterogeneity in NF1, mutation detection rates(More)
Habitat fragmentation can restrict geneflow, reduce neighbourhood effective population size, and increase genetic drift and inbreeding in small, isolated habitat remnants. The extent to which habitat fragmentation leads to population fragmentation, however, differs among landscapes and taxa. Commonly, researchers use information on the current status of a(More)
Retinoic acid (RA) induces differentiation of neuroblastoma cells in vitro and is used with variable success to treat aggressive forms of this disease. This variability in clinical response to RA is enigmatic, as no mutations in components of the RA signaling cascade have been found. Using a large-scale RNAi genetic screen, we identify crosstalk between the(More)
CONTEXT Autosomal dominant inactivating sprouty-related EVH1 domain-containing protein 1 (SPRED1) mutations have recently been described in individuals presenting mainly with café au lait macules (CALMs), axillary freckling, and macrocephaly. The extent of the clinical spectrum of this new disorder needs further delineation. OBJECTIVE To determine the(More)
PURPOSE "Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome" describes the complex of multiple nonossifying fibromas of the long bones, mandibular giant cell lesions, and café-au-lait macules in individuals without neurofibromas. We sought to determine whether Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome is a distinct genetic entity or a variant of neurofibromatosis type 1. METHODS We performed(More)
Cutaneous neurofibromas are the hallmarks of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). They are composed of multiple cell types, and traditionally they are believed to arise from small nerve tributaries of the skin. A key finding in the context of this view has been that subpopulations of tumor Schwann cells harbor biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene (NF1(-/-)).(More)
Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct(More)
In mice, tissue-specific alternative splicing of the myosin V gene in the C-terminal tail domain is well documented with exclusion of exon F from brain transcripts, but present in skin, particularly in melanocytes. As alternative splicing of the myosin V C-terminal tail domain in human tissues is undocumented, we studied the presence of myosin V splice(More)
Genomic rearrangements can cause both Mendelian and complex disorders. Currently, several major mechanisms causing genomic rearrangements, such as non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS), and microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR), have been proposed.(More)
Long interspersed (L1) and Alu elements are actively amplified in the human genome through retrotransposition of their RNA intermediates by the -100 still retrotranspositionally fully competent L1 elements. Retrotransposition can cause inherited disease if such an element is inserted near or within a functional gene. Using direct cDNA sequencing as the(More)