Tobias Stauber

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Regulation of cell volume is critical for many cellular and organismal functions, yet the molecular identity of a key player, the volume-regulated anion channel VRAC, has remained unknown. A genome-wide small interfering RNA screen in mammalian cells identified LRRC8A as a VRAC component. LRRC8A formed heteromers with other LRRC8 multispan membrane(More)
The profound luminal acidification essential for the degradative function of lysosomes requires a counter-ion flux to dissipate an opposing voltage that would prohibit proton accumulation. It has generally been assumed that a parallel anion influx is the main or only counter-ion transport that enables acidification. Indeed, defective anion conductance has(More)
The small GTPase rab6A but not the isoform rab6A' has previously been identified as a regulator of the COPI-independent recycling route that carries Golgi-resident proteins and certain toxins from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The isoform rab6A' has been implicated in Golgi-to-endosomal recycling. Because rab6A but not A', binds rabkinesin6,(More)
Mutations in the ClC-7/Ostm1 ion transporter lead to osteopetrosis and lysosomal storage disease. Its lysosomal localization hitherto precluded detailed functional characterization. Using a mutated ClC-7 that reaches the plasma membrane, we now show that both the aminoterminus and transmembrane span of the Ostm1 β-subunit are required for ClC-7(More)
During lysosomal acidification, proton-pump currents are thought to be shunted by a chloride ion (Cl-) channel, tentatively identified as ClC-7. Surprisingly, recent data suggest that ClC-7 instead mediates Cl-/proton (H+) exchange. We generated mice carrying a point mutation converting ClC-7 into an uncoupled (unc) Cl- conductor. Despite maintaining(More)
Proteins of the CLC gene family assemble to homo- or sometimes heterodimers and either function as Cl(-) channels or as Cl(-)/H(+)-exchangers. CLC proteins are present in all phyla. Detailed structural information is available from crystal structures of bacterial and algal CLCs. Mammals express nine CLC genes, four of which encode Cl(-) channels and five(More)
Members of the CLC protein family of Cl(-) channels and transporters display the remarkable ability to function as either chloride channels or Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters. Due to the intracellular localization of ClC-6 and ClC-7, it has not yet been possible to study the biophysical properties of these members of the late endosomal/lysosomal CLC branch in(More)
Luminal acidification is of pivotal importance for the physiology of the secretory and endocytic pathways and its diverse trafficking events. Acidification by the proton-pumping V-ATPase requires charge compensation by counterion currents that are commonly attributed to chloride. The molecular identification of intracellular chloride transporters and the(More)
The bidirectional nature of late endosome/lysosome movement suggests involvement of at least two distinct motors, one minus-end directed and one plus-end directed. Previous work has identified dynein as the minus-end-directed motor for late endosome/lysosome localization and dynamics. Conventional kinesin (kinesin-1) has been implicated in plus-end-directed(More)
Mutations in either ClC-7, a late endosomal/lysosomal member of the CLC family of chloride channels and transporters, or in its beta-subunit Ostm1 cause osteopetrosis and lysosomal storage disease in mice and humans. The severe phenotype of mice globally deleted for ClC-7 or Ostm1 and the absence of storage material in cultured cells hampered investigations(More)