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Rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor is powered by a transmembrane gradient of protons or, in some species, sodium ions. The molecular mechanism of coupling between ion flow and motor rotation is not understood. The proteins most closely involved in motor rotation are MotA, MotB, and FliG. MotA and MotB are transmembrane proteins that function in(More)
Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae glide rapidly over surfaces by an unknown mechanism. Eight genes required for gliding motility have been described. Complementation of the nonmotile mutant UW102-48 identified another gene, gldJ, that is required for gliding. gldJ mutants formed nonspreading colonies, and individual cells were completely nonmotile. Like(More)
Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae glide rapidly over surfaces. The mechanism of F. johnsoniae gliding motility is not known. Eight gld genes required for gliding motility have been described. Disruption of any of these genes results in complete loss of gliding motility, deficiency in chitin utilization, and resistance to bacteriophages that infect(More)
Bacterial flagella are turned by rotary motors that obtain energy from the membrane gradient of protons or sodium ions. The stator of the flagellar motor is formed from the membrane proteins MotA and MotB, which associate in complexes that contain multiple copies of each protein. The complexes conduct ions across the membrane, and couple ion flow to motor(More)
Among the many proteins needed for the assembly and function of bacterial flagella, only five have been suggested to be involved in torque generation. These are MotA, MotB, FliG, FliM and FliN. In this study, we have probed binding interactions among these proteins, by using protein fusions to glutathione S-transferase or to oligo-histidine, in conjunction(More)
The stator of the bacterial flagellar motor is formed from the membrane proteins MotA and MotB, which associate in complexes with stoichiometry MotA(4)MotB(2) (Kojima, S., and Blair, D. F., preceding paper in this issue). The MotA/MotB complexes conduct ions across the membrane, and couple ion flow to flagellar rotation by a mechanism that appears to(More)
Bacterial flagellar motors obtain energy for rotation from the membrane gradient of protons or, in some species, sodium ions. The molecular mechanism of flagellar rotation is not understood. MotA and MotB are integral membrane proteins that function in proton conduction and are believed to form the stator of the motor. Previous mutational studies identified(More)
Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae glide rapidly over surfaces by an unknown mechanism. Seven genes (gldA, gldB, gldD, gldF, gldG, gldH, and ftsX) that are required for gliding motility have been described. Complementation of the nonmotile mutants UW102-41, UW102-85, and UW102-92 identified another gene, gldI, that is required for gliding motility. gldI(More)
Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae move rapidly over surfaces by gliding motility. The mechanism of this form of motility is not known. Six genes (gldA, gldB, gldD, gldF, gldG, and ftsX) that are required for gliding have been described. Tn4351 mutagenesis was used to identify another gene, gldH, which is required for cell movement. GldH mutants formed(More)
The 308 residue MotB protein anchors the stator complex of the Escherichia coli flagellar motor to the peptidoglycan of the cell wall. Together with MotA, it comprises the transmembrane channel that delivers protons to the motor. At the outset of the mutational analysis of MotB described here, we found that the non-motile phenotype of a DeltamotAB strain(More)
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