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The mechanism(s) for chemotherapy-induced cognitive changes are largely unknown; however, several candidate mechanisms have been identified. We suggest that shared genetic risk factors for the development of cancer and cognitive problems, including low-efficiency efflux pumps, deficits in DNA-repair mechanisms and/or a deregulated immune response, coupled(More)
PURPOSE The primary purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychologic functioning of long-term survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who had been treated with standard-dose systemic chemotherapy or local therapy only. PATIENTS AND METHODS Long-term survivors (5 years postdiagnosis, not presently receiving cancer treatment, and disease-free) of(More)
It has become increasingly apparent that cytotoxic drugs given systemically for non-CNS tumours might have cognitive side-effects, but many fundamental questions require further elucidation, and large samples from several institutions are needed. Two working groups brought together by the International Cognition and Cancer Task Force (ICCTF) developed(More)
CONTEXT There are few randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of palliative care interventions to improve the care of patients with advanced cancer. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of a nursing-led intervention on quality of life, symptom intensity, mood, and resource use in patients with advanced cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS(More)
PURPOSE To prospectively examine alterations in working memory (WM) -associated brain activation related to breast cancer and treatment by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients treated with chemotherapy (CTx+; n = 16) or without chemotherapy (CTx-; n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 15) were scanned during an n-back(More)
Brain gray matter alterations have been reported in cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of breast cancer patients after cancer treatment. Here we report the first prospective MRI study of women undergoing treatment for breast cancer, with or without chemotherapy, as well as healthy controls. We hypothesized that chemotherapy-associated(More)
This review summarizes the current literature on cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) with a focus on prevalence, mechanisms, and possible interventions for CRCI in those who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for non-central nervous system tumours and is primarily focused on breast cancer. CRCI is characterized as deficits in areas of cognition including(More)
Cognitive changes associated with cancer and cancer treatments have become an increasing concern. Using breast cancer as the prototype, we reviewed the research from neuropsychological, imaging, genetic, and animal studies that have examined pre- and post-treatment cognitive change. An impressive body of research supports the contention that a subgroup of(More)
Purpose To compare the neuropsychological functioning of breast cancer patients with invasive cancer and noninvasive cancer prior to adjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods Breast cancer patients (N = 132) with invasive (Stages 1–3, N = 110, age = 54.1 ± 8.1) or noninvasive (Stage 0, N = 22, age = 55.8 ± 8.0) disease completed a battery of(More)
PURPOSE To examine the impact of age and cognitive reserve on cognitive functioning in patients with breast cancer who are receiving adjuvant treatments. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with breast cancer exposed to chemotherapy (n = 60; mean age, 51.7 years) were evaluated with a battery of neuropsychological and psychological tests before treatment and at(More)