Tiffany I. Hsiao

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The ability to heal wounds is an ancient and conserved function of epidermal epithelial layers. The importance of skin wound healing to human life and biology has long been evident, however many of the molecular mechanisms underlying wound repair remain little understood. In the past several years, analysis of the C. elegans innate immune response to fungal(More)
Epidermal barrier epithelia form a first line of defense against the environment, protecting animals against infection and repairing physical damage. In C. elegans, death-associated protein kinase (DAPK-1) regulates epidermal morphogenesis, innate immunity and wound repair. Combining genetic suppressor screens and pharmacological tests, we find that DAPK-1(More)
Objectives:Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a well-documented risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Seven HCV genotypes have been classified, and the genotypes show a great variety of geographic distribution. HCV genotype 6 is prevalent in Southeast Asia and has been less studied than the other genotypes.Methods:This follow-up study was(More)
Commentary to: Xu S, Chisholm AD. A Gαq-Ca signaling pathway promotes actin-mediated epidermal wound closure in C. elegans. Curr Biol 2011; 21:1960–7; PMID:22100061; http://dx.doi. org/10.1016/j.cub.2011.10.050 The ability to heal wounds is an ancient and conserved function of epidermal epithelial layers. The importance of skin wound healing to human life(More)
The skin of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is composed of a simple epidermal epithelium and overlying cuticle. The skin encloses the animal and plays central roles in body morphology and physiology; its simplicity and accessibility make it a tractable genetic model for several aspects of skin biology. Epidermal precursors are specified by a hierarchy(More)
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