Thuy T. Frakking

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BACKGROUND Oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) can lead to recurrent respiratory illnesses and chronic lung disease in children. Current clinical feeding evaluations performed by speech pathologists have poor reliability in detecting OPA when compared to radiological procedures such as the modified barium swallow (MBS). Improved ability to diagnose OPA(More)
BACKGROUND Cervical auscultation (CA) may be used to complement feeding/swallowing evaluations when assessing for aspiration. There are no published pediatric studies that compare the properties of sounds between aspirating and nonaspirating swallows. AIM To establish acoustic and perceptual profiles of aspirating and nonaspirating swallow sounds and(More)
In this study, we aimed to determine if the use of cervical auscultation (CA) as an adjunct to the clinical feeding evaluation (CFE + CA) improves the reliability of predicting oropharyngeal aspiration (abbreviated to aspiration) in children. The design of the study is based on open label, randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation. Results from(More)
Limited data on cervical auscultation (CA) sounds during the transitional feeding period of 4–36 months in healthy children exist. This study examined the acoustic and perceptual parameters of swallowing sounds in children aged 4–36 months over a range of food and fluid consistencies. Using CA, swallowing sounds were recorded from a microphone as children(More)
PURPOSE Limited data exist that support the reproducibility of cervical auscultation (CA) use in children. This study aimed to determine the reliability of CA in detecting oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) in children within a controlled environment. METHOD This observational study included eight speech-language pathologists who rated clips of 40 normal and(More)
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