Thomas McColgan

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Inputs from the two sides of the brain interact to create maps of interaural time difference (ITD) in the nucleus laminaris of birds. How inputs from each side are matched with high temporal precision in ITD-sensitive circuits is unknown, given the differences in input path lengths from each side. To understand this problem in birds, we modeled the geometry(More)
Axons from the nucleus magnocellularis form a presynaptic map of interaural time differences (ITDs) in the nucleus laminaris (NL). These inputs generate a field potential that varies systematically with recording position and can be used to measure the map of ITDs. In the barn owl, the representation of best ITD shifts with mediolateral position in NL, so(More)
Axons from the nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and their targets in nucleus laminaris (NL) form the circuit responsible for encoding interaural time differences (ITDs). In barn owls, NL receives bilateral inputs from NM such that axons from the ipsilateral NM enter NL dorsally, while contralateral axons enter from the ventral side. These afferents and their(More)
Axons from the nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and their targets in nucleus laminaris (NL) form the circuit responsible for encoding interaural time difference (ITD). In barn owls, NL receives bilateral inputs from NM, such that axons from the ipsilateral NM enter NL dorsally, while contralateral axons enter from the ventral side. These afferents act as delay(More)
16 Inputs from the two sides of the brain interact to create maps of interaural time difference (ITD) 17 in the nucleus laminaris of birds. How inputs from each side are matched with high temporal precision 18 in ITD sensitive circuits is unknown, given the differences in input path lengths from each side. To 19 understand this problem in birds, we modeled(More)
Philipp Berens, Jeremy Freeman, Thomas Deneux, Nicolay Chenkov, Thomas McColgan, Artur Speiser, Jakob H. Macke, Srinivas C. Turaga, Patrick Mineault, Peter Rupprecht, Stephan Gerhard, Rainer W. Friedrich, Johannes Friedrich, Liam Paninski, Marius Pachitariu, Kenneth D. Harris, Ben Bolte, Timothy A. Machado, Dario Ringach, Jasmine Stone, Nicolas J.(More)
Extracellular field potentials (EFPs) are an important source of information in neuroscience, but their physiological basis is in many cases still a matter of debate. Axonal sources are typically discounted in modeling and data analysis because their contributions are assumed to be negligible. Here, we established experimentally and theoretically that(More)
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