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The responses of single neurons in the primary and secondary auditory cortex of cat were recorded during the presentation of sequences consisting of five tones of different frequencies. Discharges to tones within these sequences usually (84%) exhibited a dependence on the 'direction' of the sequence (ascending, descending, or mixed frequencies). For(More)
OBJECTIVE The development and application of data-driven decision-support systems for medical triage, diagnostics, and prognostics pose special requirements on physiologic data. In particular, that data are reliable in order to produce meaningful results. The authors describe a method that automatically estimates the reliability of reference heart rates(More)
Anatomical and physiological investigations in cat and monkeys have demonstrated the existence of association areas where evoked and unit responses associated with more than one sensory modality can be recorded. Although it is often assumed that these areas of association cortex form the anatomical substratum for complex cognitive and integrative behavior(More)
Previously we reported that acetylcholine (ACh) and acetyl-beta-methacholine (MCh) modify responses of neurons in auditory cortex to individual frequencies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscarinic agonists produce frequency-specific alterations or general changes in cellular responses. Frequency-specific modifications would be evident(More)
Exogenously applied muscarinic agonists--for example, acetylcholine (ACh) and acetyl-beta-methacholine (MCh)--modify frequency receptive fields in auditory cortex of unanesthetized animals in a frequency-specific rather than global manner. The present study sought to relate these findings to endogenous actions of ACh by using the anticholinesterase agents(More)
The present experiments studied the effects of cholinergic agonists and antagonists on the spontaneous and acoustic-evoked discharge of auditory cortical neurons and examined whether these effects were mediated by muscarinic cholinergic receptors. A primary focus of this report is the analysis of specific effects of these agents on the spontaneous and(More)
Muscular atonia and cortical desynchronization, two signs of desynchronized sleep, can be enhanced or suppressed by direct injection of carbachol into the pontine brain stem of cats. The positive effects are graded, being maximal in the gigantocellular tegmental field and less marked in adjacent nuclei. These positive effects are dose-dependent. Suppressive(More)