Learn More
Evidence is reviewed concerning the brain areas and neurotransmitters involved in aggressive behavior in the cat and rodent. In the cat, two distinct neural circuits involving the hypothalamus and PAG subserve two different kinds of aggression: defensive rage and predatory (quiet-biting) attack. The roles played by the neurotransmitters serotonin, GABA,(More)
1. Violence and aggression are major public health problems. 2. The authors have used techniques of electrical brain stimulation, anatomical-immunohistochemical techniques, and behavioral pharmacology to investigate the neural systems and circuits underlying aggressive behavior in the cat. 3. The medial hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray are the(More)
Previous studies had demonstrated that, in the cat, aggression is mediated by glutamatergic neurons in the anterior medial hypothalamus which project to the periaqueductal gray. Additionally, NK(1) receptor activation in the medial hypothalamus plays a role in the regulation of aggressive behavior by the medial amygdala. In the present study, in situ(More)
This study utilized anatomical and behavioral-pharmacological methods to determine the role of NK(1)-Substance P receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in defensive rage behavior in cats. For behavioral pharmacological experiments, monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted in the medial hypothalamus for elicitation of defensive rage(More)
Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that environmental lead exposure is associated with aggressive behavior in children; however, numerous confounding variables limit the ability of these studies to establish a causal relationship. The study of aggressive behavior using a validated animal model was used to test the hypothesis that there is a causal(More)
Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded epidurally at vertex in the freely moving rat, yielding the prominent components P18 and N40 from the average waveform. Both components were severely attenuated at tone presentation rates faster than 1 Hz. Dependence of the vertex AEP on central cholinergic activation was assessed by comparing the effects of(More)
This study reports the incidence of the various types of cleft lip and/or palate drawn from a regional database of all affected children born in Northern Ireland during the period 1980-1990. The incidence of these anomalies was 1.28 per 1000 live births (1:781). Fifty-three per cent of clefts involved the secondary palate only, 16 per cent the primary(More)
Defensive rage in the cat occurs naturally in response to a threat and is also elicited by electrical or chemical stimulation over the rostro-caudal extent of the medial hypothalamus and dorsolateral aspect of the periaqueductal gray (PAG). This behavior is mediated over a descending projection from the hypothalamus to the midbrain PAG. The underlying(More)
Evidence is reviewed concerning the brain areas and neurotransmitters involved in aggressive behavior in the cat and rodent. In the cat, two distinct neural circuits involving the hypothalamus and PAG subserve two different kinds of aggression: defensive rage and predatory (quiet-biting) attack. The roles played by the neurotransmitters serotonin, GABA,(More)
  • 1