Thim Strothmann

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We consider programmable matter consisting of simple computational elements, called particles, that can establish and release bonds and can actively move in a self-organized way, and we investigate the feasibility of solving fundamental problems relevant for programmable matter. As a suitable model for such self-organizing particle systems, we will use a(More)
This material is based on work in progress. Imagine that we had a piece of matter that can change its physical properties like shape, density, conductivity, or color in a programmable fashion based on either user input or autonomous sensing. This is the vision behind what is commonly known as programmable matter. Programmable matter is the subject of many(More)
We envision programmable matter consisting of systems of computationally limited devices (which we call <i>particles</i>) that are able to self-organize in order to achieve a desired collective goal without the need for central control or external intervention. Central problems for these particle systems are shape formation and coating problems. In this(More)
Imagine that we had a piece of matter that can change its physical properties like shape, density, conductivity, or color in a programmable fashion based on either user input or autonomous sensing. This is the vision behind what is commonly known as programmable matter. Many proposals have already been made for realizing programmable matter, ranging from(More)
The term programmable matter refers to matter which has the ability to change its physical properties (shape, density, moduli, conductivity, optical properties, etc.) in a programmable fashion, based upon user input or autonomous sensing. This has many applications like smart materials, autonomous monitoring and repair, and minimal invasive surgery, so(More)
A fundamental problem for peer-to-peer systems is to maintain connectivity while nodes are leaving, i.e., the nodes requesting to leave the peer-topeer system are excluded from the overlay network without affecting its connectivity. There are a number of studies for safe node exclusion if the overlay is in a well-defined state initially. Surprisingly, the(More)
The idea behind universal coating is to have a thin layer of a specific substance covering an object of any shape so that one can measure a certain condition (like temperature or cracks) at any spot on the surface of the object without requiring direct access to that spot. We study the universal coating problem in the context of self-organizing programmable(More)
Imagine coating buildings and bridges with smart particles (also coined smart paint) that monitor structural integrity and sense and report on traffic and wind loads, leading to technology that could do such inspection jobs faster and cheaper and increase safety at the same time. In this paper, we study the problem of uniformly coating objects of arbitrary(More)
A fundamental problem for overlay networks is to safely exclude leaving nodes, i.e., the nodes requesting to leave the overlay network are excluded from it without affecting its connectivity. There are a number of studies for safe node exclusion if the overlay is in a well-defined state, but almost no formal results are known for the case in which the(More)
We consider programmable matter that consists of computationally limited devices (called particles) that are able to self-organize in order to achieve some collective goal without the need for central control or external intervention. We use the geometric amoebot model to describe such self-organizing particle systems, which defines how particles can(More)