Tecla Bonci

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When joint kinematics is analyzed using noninvasive stereophotogrammetry, movements of the skin markers relative to the underlying bone are regarded as artefacts (soft tissue artefact (STA)). Recent literature suggests that an appropriate estimation of joint kinematics may be obtained by compensating for only a portion of the STA, but no evidence for this(More)
When stereophotogrammetry and skin-markers are used, bone-pose estimation is jeopardised by the soft tissue artefact (STA). At marker-cluster level, this can be represented using a modal series of rigid (RT; translation and rotation) and non-rigid (NRT; homothety and scaling) geometrical transformations. The NRT has been found to be smaller than the RT and(More)
When using stereophotogrammetry and skin-markers, the reconstruction of skeletal movement is affected by soft-tissue artefact (STA). This may be described by considering a marker-cluster as a deformable shape undergoing a geometric transformation formed by a non-rigid (change in size and shape) and a rigid component (translation and rotation displacements).(More)
When analysing human movement through stereophotogrammetry, skin-markers are used. Their movement relative to the underlying bone is known as a soft tissue artefact (STA). A mathematical model to estimate subject- and marker-specific STAs generated during a given motor task, is required for both skeletal kinematic estimators and comparative assessment using(More)
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