Tatjana Lutovac

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i Preface The concept of strategy allows describing and guiding computations and deductions in automated theorem provers, proof checkers, logical frameworks. Strategies are used for various purposes, e.g. for-proof search in theorem proving,-combining diierent proof techniques and computation paradigms,-program transformation,-developing heuristics for(More)
A key property in the definition of logic programming languages is the completeness of goal-directed proofs. This concept originated in the study of logic programming languages for intuitionistic logic in the (single-conclusioned) sequent calculus LJ, but has subsequently been adapted to multiple-conclusioned systems such as those for linear logic. Given(More)
Many important results in proof theory for sequent calculus (cut-elimination, completeness and other properties of search strategies, etc) are proved using permutations of sequent rules. The focus of this paper is on the development of systematic and automated-oriented techniques for the analysis of permutability in some sequent calculi. A representation of(More)
A key property in the definition of logic programming languages is the completeness of goal-directed proofs. This concept originated in the study of logic programming languages for intuitionistic logic in the (single-conclusioned) sequent calculus LJ, but has subsequently been adapted to multiple-conclusioned systems such as those for linear logic. Given(More)
Logic programs consist of formulas of mathematical logic and various proof-theoretic techniques can be used to design and analyse execution models for such programs. We brieey review the main problems, which are questions that are still elusive in the design of logic programming languages, from a proof-theoretic point of view. Existing strategies which lead(More)
A key property in the definition of logic programming languages is the completeness of goaldirected proofs. This concept originated in the study of logic programming languages for intuitionistic logic in the (single-conclusioned) sequent calculus LJ, but has subsequently been adapted to multiple-conclusioned systems such as those for linear logic. Given(More)