Learn More
We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine task-specific modulations of effective connectivity within a left-hemisphere language network during spelling and rhyming judgments on visually presented words. We identified sites showing task-specific activations for rhyming in the lateral temporal cortex (LTC) and for spelling in the intraparietal(More)
BACKGROUND The current study examined the neuro-cognitive network of visual word rhyming judgment in 14 children with dyslexia and 14 age-matched control children (8- to 14-year-olds) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS In order to manipulate the difficulty of mapping orthography to phonology, we used conflicting and(More)
Using Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined effective connectivity between three left hemisphere brain regions (inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus) and bilateral medial frontal gyrus in 12 children with reading difficulties (M age=12.4, range: 8.11-14.10) and 12 control(More)
Previous studies have shown that developmental changes in the structure and function of prefrontal regions can continue throughout childhood and adolescence. Our recent results suggested a role for the left inferior frontal cortex in modulating task-dependent shifts in effective connectivity when adults focus on orthographic versus phonological aspects of(More)
The roles of the cerebellum and basal ganglia have typically been confined in the literature to motor planning and control. However, mounting evidence suggests that these structures are involved in more cognitive domains such as language processing. In the current study, we looked at effective connectivity (the influence that one brain region has on(More)
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to explore the neural correlates of semantic judgments to visual words in a group of 9- to 15-year-old children. Subjects were asked to indicate if word pairs were related in meaning. Consistent with previous findings in adults, children showed activation in bilateral inferior frontal gyri (Brodmann area(More)
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to explore the neural correlates of semantic judgments in the auditory modality in a group of 9- to 15-year-old children. Subjects were required to indicate if word pairs were related in meaning. Consistent with previous findings in adults, children showed activation in bilateral superior temporal gyri(More)
Neuroimaging studies have suggested that left inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule and left middle temporal gyrus are critical for semantic processing in normal children. The goal of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to determine whether these regions are systematically related to semantic processing in(More)
Developmental differences (9- to 15-year-olds) in effective connectivity in left hemisphere regions were examined using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Children completed spelling tasks in the visual and auditory modalities in which they were asked to determine if two words were spelled the same from the(More)
We examined age-related changes in the interactions among brain regions in children performing rhyming judgments on visually presented words. The difficulty of the task was manipulated by including a conflict between task-relevant (phonological) information and task-irrelevant (orthographic) information. The conflicting conditions included pairs of words(More)