Tako M Horsley

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In this study, children with the guessing subtype of dyslexia (who read fast and inaccurately) were compared with children with the spelling subtype (who read slowly and accurately) on three aspects of executive functioning (EF): response inhibition, susceptibility to interference from irrelevant information, and planning. It was found that guessers were(More)
The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the inhibitory deficits previously found in children with the guessing subtype of dyslexia (who read fast and inaccurately) can be attributed to dysfunctions in the fronto-central brain areas. For this purpose, the electrocortical correlates of the inhibition mechanism were assessed in a stop task that(More)
This study examined hemispheric specialization for stop task performance. It was found that inhibitory performance was better for stop signals presented in the right visual field. This result provided support for the hypothesis that, during stop task performance, subjects call upon the left-lateralized neural system that is involved in active attention. It(More)
In Experiment 1, the effects of stop signal modality on the speed and efficiency of the inhibition process were examined. Stop signal reaction time (SSRT) and inhibition function slope in an auditory stop signal condition were compared to SSRT and inhibition function slope in a visual stop signal condition. It was found that auditory stop signals compared(More)
The present study focused on the nature of the reading disability of children with the guessing subtype of dyslexia (who read fast and inaccurately). The objective was to separate the excitatory account of their reading disturbance (i.e., in guessers the words' resting levels of activation are oversensitive to semantic context) from the inhibitory account(More)
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