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Plants belonging to the legume family develop nitrogen-fixing root nodules in symbiosis with bacteria commonly known as rhizobia. The legume host encodes all of the functions necessary to build the specialized symbiotic organ, the nodule, but the process is elicited by the bacteria. Molecular communication initiates the interaction, and signals, usually(More)
The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of a symbiotic bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 was determined. The genome of B. japonicum was a single circular chromosome 9,105,828 bp in length with an average GC content of 64.1%. No plasmid was detected. The chromosome comprises 8317 potential protein-coding genes, one set of rRNA genes and 50(More)
The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of a symbiotic bacterium Mesorhizobium loti strain MAFF303099 was determined. The genome of M. loti consisted of a single chromosome (7,036, 071 bp) and two plasmids, designated as pMLa (351,911 bp) and pMLb (208,315 bp). The chromosome comprises 6752 potential protein-coding genes, two sets of rRNA genes and(More)
Most higher plant species can enter a root symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, in which plant carbon is traded for fungal phosphate. This is an ancient symbiosis, which has been detected in fossils of early land plants. In contrast, the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses of plants with bacteria evolved more recently, and are phylogenetically(More)
The legume Lotus japonicus has been widely used as a model system to investigate the genetic background of legume-specific phenomena such as symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here, we report structural features of the L. japonicus genome. The 315.1-Mb sequences determined in this and previous studies correspond to 67% of the genome (472 Mb), and are likely to(More)
In legumes, root nodule organogenesis is activated in response to morphogenic lipochitin oligosaccharides that are synthesized by bacteria, commonly known as rhizobia. Successful symbiotic interaction results in the formation of highly specialized organs called root nodules, which provide a unique environment for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. In wild-type(More)
A combined genetic and transcriptome analysis was performed to study the molecular basis of the arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis. By testing the AM phenotype of nodulation-impaired mutants and complementation analysis, we defined seven Lotus japonicus common symbiosis genes (SYMRK, CASTOR, POLLUX, SYM3, SYM6, SYM15, and SYM24) that are required for both(More)
The nucleotide sequence of the complete genome of a cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843, was determined. The genome of M. aeruginosa is a single, circular chromosome of 5,842,795 base pairs (bp) in length, with an average GC content of 42.3%. The chromosome comprises 6312 putative protein-encoding genes, two sets of rRNA genes, 42 tRNA genes(More)
CyanoBase (http://genome.kazusa.or.jp/cyanobase) is the genome database for cyanobacteria, which are model organisms for photosynthesis. The database houses cyanobacteria species information, complete genome sequences, genome-scale experiment data, gene information, gene annotations and mutant information. In this version, we updated these datasets and(More)
Leguminous plants have many paralogous genes encoding enzymes involved in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. Duplicate genes are predicted to contribute to the production of various flavonoid compounds and to have resulted in a diversity of legume species. We identified gene duplication in the transcription factors regulating flavonoid biosynthesis in the(More)