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Nematicidal action of Pleurotus eryngii metabolites
TLDR
P. eryngii fungus and its extract significantly reduced (p) and the effect of this fungus culture extract on Meloidogyne javanica eggs is evaluated. Expand
Assessment of compatibility between the nematophagous fungi Arthrobotrys robusta and Duddingtonia flagrans under laboratory conditions.
TLDR
It is shown that rthrobotrys robusta and Duddingtonia flagrans do not produce compounds capable of inhibiting one another in a joint application, and the action of volatile antibiotics in inhibiting mycelial growth is suggested. Expand
Biological control of infective larvae of Ancylostoma spp. in beach sand.
TLDR
The results of this study confirm earlier work on the efficiency of the Duddingtonia genus in the control of Ancylostoma spp. Expand
Pochonia chlamydosporia applied via seed treatment for nematode control in two soil types
TLDR
The fungus was able to percolate in the soil up to at least 50 cm depth and was efficient in controlling M. incognita in both sandy and clayey soils; however, in the sandy soil, the fungus presented greater colonization and percolation, which may explain why it is more efficient in controls the nematode when applied in sandy soil. Expand
Nematophagus fungi increasing phosphorus uptake and promoting plant growth
TLDR
It is concluded that P. chlamydosporia and D. flagrans are potentially useful not just for nematode control but also for promoting plant growth and for increasing nutrient use efficiency. Expand
Interactions Between Pochonia chlamydosporia and Nematodes
TLDR
This chapter provides an overview of the process of infection of nematodes by Pochonia and the role of the environment on the fungus-nematode interaction. Expand
Understanding How Pochonia chlamydosporia Increases Phosphorus Availability
Abstract The fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia (Pc) has been increasingly used to control plant-parasitic nematodes. This fungus also increases the uptake of nutrients by plants. However, the mechanismsExpand
First report of matricidal hatching in Meloidogyne hapla
TLDR
It is suggested that matricidal hatching is not common in the population of M. hapla, because second-stage juveniles (J2) were clearly observed inside of the female body cavity and the highest numbers of J2 and eggs observed per female were 57 and 350, respectively. Expand
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