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New Caledonia: a very old Darwinian island?
TLDR
New Caledonia must be considered as a very old Darwinian island, a concept that offers many more fascinating opportunities of study, as it is contradicted by geological evidence indicating long Palaeocene and Eocene submersions and by recent biogeographic and phylogenetic studies.
Phylogeny of Dictyoptera: Dating the Origin of Cockroaches, Praying Mantises and Termites with Molecular Data and Controlled Fossil Evidence
TLDR
The authors' datings suggest that crown-Dictyoptera—and stem-mantises—would date back to the Late Carboniferous, a result compatible with the oldest putative fossil of stem-dictyopteran suborders, and suggests a scenario of replacement in carnivory among polyneopterous insects.
Laying the foundations of evolutionary and systematic studies in crickets (Insecta, Orthoptera): a multilocus phylogenetic analysis
TLDR
The first phylogenetic hypothesis for the evolution of crickets sensu lato is proposed, based on analysis of 205 species, representing 88% of the subfamilies and 71% tribes currently listed in the database Orthoptera Species File (OSF).
Older than New Caledonia emergence? A molecular phylogenetic study of the eneopterine crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea)
TLDR
The phylogenetic studies invalidate a simple scenario of local persistence of this group in New Caledonia since 80 Ma, or, if one accepts the submergence of NewCaledonia, by local island-hopping among other subaerial islands, now drowned, in the region during periods of New Calingonian submergence.
Phylogeny and the evolution of calling songs in Gryllus (Insecta, Orthoptera, Gryllidae)
TLDR
This paper discusses, in relation to the evolution of the North American species of Gryllus, the reliability of these criteria and describes songs using two complementary sets of characters: general structure (carrier frequencies and main temporal features) and ‘special quality’.
Eneopterinae crickets (Insecta, Orthoptera, Grylloidea) from Vanuatu
TLDR
Seven new species of Eneopterinae crickets from Vanuatu are described and descriptions focus on male and female genitalia, and forewing venation, while data is presented to define fine-scaled habitat, behaviour, and song repertoires.
High-frequency calling in Eneopterinae crickets (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Eneopteridae): adaptive radiation revealed by phylogenetic analysis
TLDR
Investigation of cladogenesis rate indicated that the onset of high Fd in [Cardiodactylus (Lebinthus–Agnotecous)] was accompanied by a highcladogenesis rate, supporting a hypothesis of adaptive radiation for high-frequency calling (phylogeny criterion of adaptation).
A shift toward harmonics for high-frequency calling shown with phylogenetic study of frequency spectra in Eneopterinae crickets (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Eneopteridae)
TLDR
Based on the analysis of the frequency spectra in reference to phylogeny, it is shown that a shift of dominant frequency from the fundamental toward the second or the third harmonic of the song occurred in the Lebinthini tribe.
Mechanisms of high-frequency song generation in brachypterous crickets and the role of ghost frequencies
TLDR
The hypothesis that high-frequency songs evolved stepwise, by a form of punctuated evolution that could be related to functional constraints, rather than by only the progressive increase of the ancestral fundamental frequency, is supported.
Evolution of acoustic communication in crickets: phylogeny of Eneopterinae reveals an adaptive radiation involving high-frequency calling (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Eneopteridae).
TLDR
Evolution of dominant frequencies in songs of Eneopterinae crickets was studied with respect to phylogeny and the effectiveness of high-frequency calling is discussed in relation to the species behavior ecology.
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