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Morphology and ecology of Sibon snakes (Squamata: Dipsadidae) from two forests in Central America
Medidas morfometricas foram tomadas, foi estimada abundância e feitas observacoes ecologicas para Sibon annulatus, S. argus, S. longifrenis e S. nebulatus em dois habitats neotropicais: Uma florestaExpand
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Foraging behaviour of three primate species in a Costa Rican coastal lowland tropical wet forest
Primates are predominantly distributed across tropical regions, many of which are threatened by deforestation. Removal of mature trees can harm primate populations by reducing avail- able foodExpand
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High speed boat traffic: a risk to crocodilian populations.
—Injuries related to boat traffic have been documented as a major source of human-related injuries and deaths in many aquatic species but have not been documented in crocodilians. We examined theExpand
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First record of ophiophagy in the widely distributed snake Leptodeira septentrionalis (Kennicott, 1859) (Ophidia, Colubridae)
trionalis (Kennicott, 1859) is a widely distributed oviparous dipsadine snake with a range from extreme southern Texas to northwestern Peru. This nocturnal arboreal genus is known to eat primarilyExpand
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Climate structuring of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in the threatened amphibians of the northern Western Ghats, India
Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a pathogen killing amphibians worldwide. Its impact across much of Asia is poorly characterized. This study systematically surveyed amphibians for Bd acrossExpand
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Description of male Tylorida sataraensis Kulkarni, 2014 (Araneae, Tetragnathidae) with notes on habits and conservation status
Abstract The male sex of Tylorida sataraensis Kulkarni, 2014 is described based on specimens from the type locality. The distinguishing characters from its closest species Tylorida ventralisExpand
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Herpetological observations from field expeditions to North Karnataka and Southwest Maharashtra, India
The Western Ghats of India are one of the 34 global hotspots of biodiversity. They are one of the most important large natural areas in the world and are fast becoming recognised for their biologicalExpand
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