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  • Influence
Are bird song complexity and song sharing shaped by habitat structure? An information theory and statistical approach.
In songbirds, song complexity and song sharing are features of prime importance for territorial defence and mate attraction. These aspects of song may be strongly influenced by changes in socialExpand
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Soft song and the readiness hypothesis: comments on Akçay et al. (2011)
  • T. Osiejuk
  • Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • 31 December 2011
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Nonpasserine bird produces soft calls and pays retaliation cost
Low-amplitude vocalizations produced during aggressive encounters, courtship, or both (quiet/soft songs) have been described for many species of song-learning passerines; however, such signals haveExpand
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How do birds search for breeding areas at the landscape level? Interpatch movements of male ortolan buntings
Animal movements at large spatial scales are of great importance in population ecology, yet little is known due to practical problems following individuals across landscapes. We studied the wholeExpand
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Song structure and repertoire variation in ortolan bunting (Emberiza hortulana L.) from isolated Norwegian population
This paper describes song structure and repertoire variation in ortolan buntings (Emberiza hortulana) from an isolated and declining Norwegian population, analysed by using the minimal unit ofExpand
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Acoustic censusing using automatic vocalization classification and identity recognition.
TLDR
This paper presents an advanced method to acoustically assess animal abundance. Expand
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A Framework for Bioacoustic Vocalization Analysis Using Hidden Markov Models
TLDR
We apply Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) as a recognition framework for automatic classification of animal vocalizations using generalized spectral features that can be easily adjusted across species and HMM network topologies suited to each task. Expand
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Neighbour–stranger call discrimination in a nocturnal rail species, the Corncrake Crex crex
AbstractThe acoustic signals of birds are commonly used for individual recognition. Calls or songs allow discrimination between parent and offspring, between mates and between territorial neighboursExpand
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Is it possible to acoustically identify individuals within a population?
AbstractAcoustically identifying individuals may be a helpful technique when it is necessary to monitor animal populations over space and time. Previous studies have largely focused on theExpand
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Frequency shift in homologue syllables of the Ortolan Bunting Emberiza hortulana
Results of this study indicate that in the Ortolan Bunting Emberiza hortulana, syllables of the same shape on sonograms (i.e. homologue syllables) often significantly differ between males inExpand
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