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Females use self-referent cues to avoid mating with previous mates
Females of many species mate repeatedly throughout their lives, often with many different males (polyandry). Females can secure genetic benefits by maximizing their diversity of mating partners, andExpand
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POLYANDRY PROMOTES ENHANCED OFFSPRING SURVIVAL IN DECORATED CRICKETS
Abstract Although female multiple mating is ubiquitous in insects, its adaptive significance remains poorly understood. Benefits to multiple mating can accrue via direct material benefits, indirectExpand
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Good genes, genetic compatibility and the evolution of polyandry: use of the diallel cross to address competing hypotheses
  • T. M. Ivy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of evolutionary biology
  • 1 March 2007
Genetic benefits can enhance the fitness of polyandrous females through the high intrinsic genetic quality of females’ mates or through the interaction between female and male genes. I used a fullExpand
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Hydration benefits to courtship feeding in crickets
The spermatophore transferred by male decorated crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) at mating includes a large gelatinous spermatophylax that the female consumes after copulation. Although previousExpand
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Female remating propensity contingent on sexual cannibalism in sagebrush crickets, Cyphoderris strepitans: a mechanism of cryptic female choice
Male sagebrush crickets (Cyphoderris strepitans) permit females to engage in an unusual form of sexual cannibalism during copulation: females feed on males’ fleshy hind wings and ingest hemolymphExpand
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Biological Inquiry: A New Course and Assessment Plan in Response to the Call to Transform Undergraduate Biology
We transformed our first-year curriculum in biology with a new course, Biological Inquiry, in which >50% of all incoming, first-year students enroll. The course replaced a traditional, content-drivenExpand
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VIRGIN-MALE MATING ADVANTAGE IN SAGEBRUSH CRICKETS: DIFFERENTIAL MALE COMPETITIVENESS OR NON-INDEPENDENT FEMALE MATE CHOICE?
Female sagebrush crickets (Cyphoderris strepitans) feed on males' fleshy hind wings during copulation and ingest haemolymph oozing from the wounds they inflict. The wounds are not fatal and usuallyExpand
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Female ornaments hinder escape from spider webs in a role-reversed swarming dance fly
Long-tailed dance flies, Rhamphomyia longicauda (Diptera: Empididae), show a striking reversal in the typical pattern of animal sexual dimorphism. Whereas male R. longicauda are mosquito-like inExpand
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Sequential mate choice in decorated crickets: females use a fixed internal threshold in pre- and postcopulatory choice
In nature, female crickets often encounter males sequentially, choosing whether to mate with each male they find rather than selecting the most attractive male from a pool of available mates. UponExpand
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POLYANDRY PROMOTES ENHANCED OFFSPRING SURVIVAL IN DECORATED CRICKETS
Abstract Although female multiple mating is ubiquitous in insects, its adaptive significance remains poorly understood. Benefits to multiple mating can accrue via direct material benefits, indirectExpand
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