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Incidence, location and reasons for avoidable in-hospital cardiac arrest in a district general hospital.
TLDR
The majority of treated in-hospital cardiac arrests are potentially avoidable, and multiple system failures include delays and errors in diagnosis, inadequate interpretation of investigations, incomplete treatment, inexperienced doctors and management in inappropriate clinical areas. Expand
Evaluation of a medical emergency team one year after implementation.
TLDR
A wider and earlier application of the MET to the hospital population may save lives or expedite DNAR decisions and further research is needed to observe significant reductions in cardiac arrests and overall mortality. Expand
Symptoms of post-concussional syndrome are non-specifically related to mild traumatic brain injury in UK Armed Forces personnel on return from deployment in Iraq: an analysis of self-reported data
TLDR
PCS symptoms are common and some are related to exposures such as blast injury, however, this association is not specific, and the same symptom complex is also related to numerous other risk factors and exposures. Expand
Tourniquet use in the civilian prehospital setting
TLDR
P Practitioners need to familiarise themselves with commercial pre-hospital tourniquets and be prepared to use one without irrational fear of complications in the appropriate cases and define the clear indications for tournique use in external haemorrhage control. Expand
The identification of risk factors for cardiac arrest and formulation of activation criteria to alert a medical emergency team.
TLDR
Risk factors for cardiac arrest have been identified, quantified and formulated into a table of activation criteria to help predict and avert cardiac arrest by alerting a clinical response. Expand
Essential role of prehospital care in the optimal outcome from major trauma
TLDR
Leading controversies reviewed are: the place of advanced life support, the role of doctors compared with paramedics, the optimal advanced airway adjunct, therole of intravenous fluids in serious injury, and the value of prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation following traumatic cardiac arrest. Expand
ABC to ABC: redefining the military trauma paradigm
TLDR
In the UK military, ABC has been replaced by ABC, where stands for catastrophic haemorrhage, the rationale for this change is explained in this commentary, together with its relevance to civilian practice. Expand
Damage Control Resuscitation
TLDR
Damage Control Resuscitation is a novel concept that draws together a series of technical and organisational advances in combat casualty care and encapsulates the established concept of damage control surgery (DCS). Expand
Benchmarking the UK Military Deployed Trauma System
TLDR
A benchmark of trauma system performance is provided by comparing NCEPOD findings with JTTR for the period 01 April 2006 to 30 September 2007, while including casualties treated by UK DMS in both Iraq and Afghanistan, the first date coincides with the start of UK combat operations in Southern Afghanistan. Expand
Military Pre-Hospital Care: Why is it Different?
TLDR
There are significant differences between the civilian and military pre-hospital trauma systems relating to patient load, injury severity and the nature of the environment, but there is opportunity to learn from each other, particularly relevant at the time the UK is actively engaging with defining the requirement for trauma centres and the re-configuration of civilian trauma systems. Expand
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