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Immune evasion by staphylococci
  • T. Foster
  • Biology
    Nature Reviews Microbiology
  • 29 November 2005
TLDR
Staphylococcus aureus can cause superficial skin infections and, occasionally, deep-seated infections that entail spread through the blood stream, and must rely primarily on cell-surface polymers and the ability to form a biolfilm to survive in the host.
Complete genomes of two clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains: evidence for the rapid evolution of virulence and drug resistance.
TLDR
The crucial role that accessory elements play in the rapid evolution of S. aureus is clearly illustrated by comparing the MSSA476 genome with that of an extremely closely related MRSA community-acquired strain; the differential distribution of large mobile elements carrying virulence and drug-resistance determinants may be responsible for the clinically important phenotypic differences in these strains.
Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus
TLDR
Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections.
Transforming the Untransformable: Application of Direct Transformation To Manipulate Genetically Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis
TLDR
Circumventing the SauUSI restriction barrier, combined with an improved deletion and transformation protocol, has allowed the genetic manipulation of previously untransformable strains of these important opportunistic pathogens.
Molecular characterization of the clumping factor (fibrinogen receptor) of Staphylococcus aureus
TLDR
The formation ofClfA gene, when introduced into the chromosome of the mutant strains, fuily compiemented the ciumping deficiency of these strains and restored the ability of these mutants to adhere to fibrinogen‐coated PMMA.
Global Regulation of Staphylococcus aureus Genes by Rot
TLDR
The findings indicate that Rot is not only a repressor but a global regulator with both positive and negative effects on the expression of S. aureus genes, and that Rot and agr have opposing effects on select target genes.
A Novel Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Phenotype Mediated by the Fibronectin-Binding Proteins, FnBPA and FnBPB
TLDR
It is reported that MRSA biofilm development was promoted under mildly acidic growth conditions triggered by the addition of glucose to the growth medium and identified a novel S. aureus biofilm phenotype promoted by FnBPA and FnBPB which is apparently independent of the known ligand-binding activities of these multifunctional surface proteins.
Clumping factor B (ClfB), a new surface‐located fibrinogen‐binding adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus
TLDR
The surface‐located fibrinogen‐binding protein (clumping factor; ClfA) of Staphylococcus aureus has an unusual dipeptide repeat linking the ligand binding domain to the wall‐anchored region, suggesting that it could contribute to the pathogenicity of biomaterial‐related infections.
The role of Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SasG in adherence and biofilm formation.
TLDR
It was concluded that the fibrillar nature of SasG explains its ability to mask binding of S. aureus microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) to their ligands and to promote formation of biofilm.
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