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We describe a process in meiotic cells of budding yeast in which chromosomes become joined together in pairs at their centromeres independent of chromosomal homology. These centromeric interactions depend on the synaptonemal complex component Zip1. During meiosis in wild-type diploids, centromere couples are initially nonhomologous and then undergo(More)
Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can instruct the conversion of differentiated cells toward pluripotency following cell-to-cell fusion by a mechanism that is rapid but poorly understood. Here, we used centrifugal elutriation to enrich for mouse ESCs at sequential stages of the cell cycle and showed that ESCs in S/G2 phases have an enhanced capacity to dominantly(More)
Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome(More)
During meiotic prophase I, proteinaceous structures called synaptonemal complexes (SCs) connect homologous chromosomes along their lengths via polymeric arrays of transverse filaments (TFs). Thus, control of TF polymerization is central to SC formation. Using budding yeast, we show that efficiency of TF polymerization closely correlates with the extent of(More)
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