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Coffin-Lowry Syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked mental retardation condition associated with skeletal abnormalities. The gene mutated in CLS, RSK2, encodes a growth factor-regulated kinase. However, the cellular and molecular bases of the skeletal abnormalities associated with CLS remain unknown. Here, we show that RSK2 is required for osteoblast differentiation(More)
The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline(More)
During the immediate-early response of mammalian cells to mitogens, histone H3 is rapidly and transiently phosphorylated by one or more unidentified kinases. Rsk-2, a member of the pp90rsk family of kinases implicated in growth control, was required for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated phosphorylation of H3. RSK-2 mutations in humans are linked to(More)
Establishing standard operating procedures (SOPs) as tools for the analysis of behavioral phenotypes is fundamental to mouse functional genomics. It is essential that the tests designed provide reliable measures of the process under investigation but most importantly that these are reproducible across both time and laboratories. For this reason, we devised(More)
Coffin-Lowry Syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked syndromic form of mental retardation associated with skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by mutations of the Rsk2 gene, which encodes a growth factor regulated kinase. Gene deletion studies in mice have shown an essential role for the Rsk2 gene in osteoblast differentiation and function, establishing a causal link(More)
The Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS), an X-linked disorder, is characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, facial and digital dysmorphisms, and progressive skeletal deformations. Genetic linkage analysis mapped the CLS locus to an interval of 2-3 megabases at Xp22.2. The gene coding for Rsk-2, a member of the growth-factor-regulated protein kinases, maps(More)
With the advent of modern developmental biology and molecular genetics, the scientific community has generated thousands of newly genetically altered strains of laboratory mice with the aim of elucidating gene function. To this end, a large group of Institutions which form the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is generating and phenotyping a(More)
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