Sverre Grimnes

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This committee was appointed by the SPR Board to provide recommendations for publishing data on electrodermal activity (EDA). They are intended to be a stand-alone source for newcomers and experienced users. A short outline of principles for electrodermal measurement is given, and recommendations from an earlier report (Fowles et al., ) are incorporated.(More)
  • S. Grimnes
  • Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing
  • 1982
The change in electrical characteristics of the skin owing to the psychogalvanic reflex has been investigated. The importance of using parallel values of admittance data is underlined because sweat-duct conductivity is anatomically in parallel with the rest of the skin. The response has been found to be mainly conductive, but small capacitive changes can(More)
  • S. Grimnes
  • Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing
  • 1983
The methods for the individual determination of skin surface electrode impedances are briefly discussed. A measurement technique is described with which it is possible to measure two skin surface electrodes simultaneously, but individually, at the same frequency. The design of a small, portable, battery-operated meter using this principle is described with(More)
In this paper, we characterize the polarization impedance behavior of several common metals in diluted NaCl solution operated at low current densities. The objective was to provide a useful reference for those wishing to calculate the electrode polarization impedance in diluted NaCl solutions. Serial equivalent resistance (R) and capacitance (C) for silver,(More)
  • S. Grimnes
  • Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing
  • 1983
It is well known that skin conductance is dependent on current flow through skin. It is shown that this may be due to an electro-osmotic effect. This can explain why in some cases negative and in other cases positive potentials increase skin conductance. Electro-osmosis implies current rectification, a powerful skin breakdown mechanism with potentials(More)
The human threshold of sensation of 50 Hz current has hitherto been considered to be around 1 mA. A new sensing mechanism is reported which lowers the threshold about 3 decades. It is elicited when the skin slides on the current carrying conductor, and the sensation disappears when the skin is wet. The sensation is a feeling of vibration or increased(More)
Blister-skin and warts have been studied as possible sources of ‘pure’ stratum corneum without sweat ducts. The purpose of the study was to assess whether the DC electrical conductance measured on human skin is totally dominated by the sweat ducts, or is also significantly contributed to by the stratum corneum itself. By means of galvanic skin response(More)
We used the finite element (FE) method to estimate the spatial sensitivity of a needle electrode for bioimpedance measurements. This current conducting needle with an insulated shaft was inserted in a saline solution and the current was measured at the neutral electrode. Model resistance and reactance were calculated and successfully compared with(More)
Electronic fingerprint systems are now gaining acceptance in mainstream consumer applications worldwide. It has been shown, however, that about 80% of these systems are easily fooled with different kinds of fake fingers with imprinted patterns. Hence, a live finger detection mechanism will be a crucial part of any fingerprint system used in security(More)
Measuring PCO2 (partial pressure of carbon dioxide) in an organ can enable early detection of ischemia. However, there are few clinical applicable solutions for measuring PCO2. Based upon the requirement for clinical applications, a conductivity based PCO2 sensor is proposed. A conductivity based PCO2 sensor measures conductance in an aqueous solution(More)