Suzanne M Sebald

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Myostatin is a secreted protein that normally functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Agents capable of blocking the myostatin signaling pathway could have important applications for treating human muscle degenerative diseases as well as for enhancing livestock production. Here we describe a potent myostatin inhibitor, a soluble form of the(More)
Myostatin is a transforming growth factor beta family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Myostatin circulates in the blood of adult mice in a noncovalently held complex with other proteins, including its propeptide, which maintain the C-terminal dimer in a latent, inactive state. This latent form of myostatin can be(More)
We have identified a new murine transforming growth factor beta superfamily member, growth-differentiation factor 15 (Gdf15), that is expressed at highest levels in adult liver. As determined by Northern analysis, the expression of Gdf15 in liver was rapidly and dramatically up-regulated following various surgical and chemical treatments that cause acute(More)
Myostatin and activin A are structurally related secreted proteins that act to limit skeletal muscle growth. The cellular targets for myostatin and activin A in muscle and the role of satellite cells in mediating muscle hypertrophy induced by inhibition of this signaling pathway have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that myostatin/activin A(More)
Myostatin is a secreted signaling molecule that normally acts to limit muscle growth. As a result, there is extensive effort directed at developing drugs capable of targeting myostatin to treat patients with muscle loss. One potential concern with this therapeutic approach in patients with muscle degenerative diseases like muscular dystrophy is that(More)
The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II consists of tandem repeats of the consensus heptapeptide YSPTSPS. Deletion studies in tissue culture cells have indicated that the CTD plays an essential role in transcription, although the nature of this essential function remains unclear. About half of the CTD can be deleted without(More)
Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a coinhibitory receptor that downregulates the activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in cancer and of virus-specific T cells in chronic infection. The molecular mechanisms driving high PD-1 expression on TILs have not been fully investigated. We demonstrate that TGFβ1 enhances antigen-induced PD-1 expression through(More)
We have identified a new murine transforming growth factor b superfamily member, growth-differentiation factor 15 (Gdf15), that is expressed at highest levels in adult liver. As determined by Northern analysis, the expression of Gdf15 in liver was rapidly and dramatically up-regulated following various surgical and chemical treatments that cause acute liver(More)
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