Susanne J. Sterbing

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How do neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) encode the spatial location of sound? We have addressed this question using a virtual auditory environment. For this purpose, the individual head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) of 18 guinea pigs were measured under free-field conditions for 122 locations covering the upper hemisphere. From 257 neurons, 94%(More)
This report describes the postnatal development of hearing range, auditory sensitivity and tonotopy within the inferior colliculus (IC) of a mammal specialized for ultrasonic hearing. The experimental animal, Carollia perspicillata, has an adult hearing range of 7-110 kHz (characteristic frequencies) but lack any significant overrepresentation of a limited(More)
The deep layers of the superior colliculus (SC) receive visual, auditory, and somatosensory input. A major function of the SC is the control of orientation movements of the eye, head, and pinna. While a topographical map for sound source direction remains elusive in primary auditory structures of mammals, such a map for azimuthal sound source directions has(More)
Bronx waltzer mice lose a great proportion of their cochlear inner hair cells during early development. Hair cell counts revealed that these mice lacked on average 86% of their inner hair cells. Outer hair cells were present in a normal number, but appeared disarranged. The effect of this inner hair cell loss on the properties of central auditory neurons(More)
One strain of homozygous Kit(W-v) mice (formerly known as W(v)/W(v)) lack 98% of the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) from birth. Inner hair cells (IHCs) and supporting cells develop normally. Thus, this strain is an attractive model to study the effect of complete OHC absence on central frequency representation. Frequency threshold curves were recorded(More)
How do neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) encode the spatial location of sound? We have addressed this question using a virtual auditory environment. For this purpose, the individual head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) of 18 guinea pigs were measured under free-field conditions for 122 locations covering the upper hemisphere. From 257 neurons, 94%(More)
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