Susana Infantes

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The presentation of short viral peptide antigens by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on cell surfaces is a key step in the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which mediate the killing of pathogen-infected cells or initiate autoimmune tissue damage. HLA-B27 is a well known class I molecule that is used to study both facets of the cellular(More)
The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the cytosol-derived proteolytic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules. Non-functional TAP complexes and viral or tumoral blocking of these transporters leads to reduced HLA class I surface expression and(More)
In the classical MHC class I Ag presentation pathway, antigenic peptides derived from viral proteins by multiple proteolytic cleavages are transported to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and are then exposed to ami-nopeptidase activity. In the current study, a long MHC class I natural ligand recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes was used to study the(More)
Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated death of virus-infected cells requires prior recognition of short viral peptide antigens that are presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on the surface of infected cells. The CTL response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infection. Using mass spectrometry(More)
The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) enables the flow of viral peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome and other proteases to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. Later, these peptide-HLA class I complexes can be recognized by CD8(+) lymphocytes. Cancerous cells and(More)
The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) delivers the viral proteolytic products generated by the proteasome in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen that are subsequently recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, several viral epitopes have been identified in TAP-deficient models. Using mass spectrometry to analyze(More)
Individuals with nonfunctional transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) complexes are not particularly susceptible to viral infections or neoplasms. Therefore, their immune system must be reasonably efficient, and the present, though reduced, cytolytic CD8 αβ T subpopulation specific for TAP-independent antigens may be sufficient to establish(More)
Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most common cause of severe respiratory infections in infants and young children, often leading to hospitalization. In addition, HRSV poses a serious health risk in immunocompromised individuals and the elderly. It has been reported that this virus can infect mouse antigen-presenting cells, including B(More)
The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells requires previous recognition of short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen class I molecules that are exposed on the surface of infected cells. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus infection. In this(More)
Short viral antigens bound to human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) class I molecules are presented on infected cells. Vaccine development frequently relies on synthetic peptides to identify optimal HLA class I ligands. However, when natural peptides are analyzed, more complex mixtures are found. By immunoproteomics analysis, we identify in this(More)
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