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OBJECTIVE To examine the relative contributions of injury severity, level of physical and cognitive disability, child behavior and family function to short-term outcome 6 months following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. DESIGN Prospective, longitudinal, between-group design, comparing preinjury and postinjury measures of functional outcome(More)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a profound impact on a child's ongoing development. Various risk factors have been found to predict outcome, but considerable variability remains unexplained. This study used a prospective, longitudinal design to examine the relationship between recovery, injury severity, age at injury and pre-injury ability. 124(More)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of acquired disability during childhood. While much is now known about outcome following TBI in the school-aged population, recovery in infants and young children is less well documented. The aim of this study was to examine neurobehavioural function following TBI during early childhood, to plot recovery over(More)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a profound impact on a child's ongoing development. Various risk factors have been found to predict outcome, but considerable variability remains unexplained. This study used a prospective, longitudinal design to examine recovery of memory function following TBI within the pre school period. Ninety-six children with TBI(More)
Much is known about outcome following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in school-age children; however, recovery in early childhood is less well understood. Some argue that such injuries should lead to good outcome, because of the plasticity of the developing brain. Other purport that the young brain is vulnerable, with injury likely to result in a substantial(More)
It has been argued that young children's brains are "plastic," and may sustain substantial brain insult with little loss of function. Recent research suggests that this notion may not apply for generalized cerebral pathology. The present study aimed to evaluate this proposition using a sample of 73 young children, divided into 3 groups: severe head injury(More)
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE Attentional deficits are common following TBI in adults. This study examined whether these skills are also vulnerable following early childhood injury, when such skills are rapidly developing. RESEARCH DESIGN This study investigated attention 30 months post-TBI in pre-schoolers (n=56) and age-matched controls (n=26). TBI children were(More)
OBJECTIVES The aim was to examine functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) during early childhood, to investigate impairments up to 5 years postinjury and identify predictors of outcome. METHODS The study compared three groups of children (mild = 11, moderate = 22, severe = 15), aged 2.0-6.11 years at injury, to a healthy control group(More)
OBJECTIVE While a small number of research papers have reported findings on attentional deficits following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), no study to date has reported findings in this area at 5 years post-TBI in very young children. This study examined attentional skills in a group of children who had sustained a mild, moderate, or severe TBI(More)
There is a lack of agreement regarding the long-term consequences of mild head injury (HI) at any age, with such effects rarely studied in early childhood. Given the rapid development occurring within the brain during this period, any disruption may have the potential to cause transient or permanent damage to brain structure and function. The present study(More)