Sudarshan Rajagopal

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Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple(More)
Ubiquitously expressed seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) classically signal through heterotrimeric G proteins and are commonly referred to as G protein-coupled receptors. It is now recognized that 7TMRs also signal through beta-arrestins, which act as versatile adapters controlling receptor signaling, desensitization, and trafficking. Most endogenous(More)
For single-cell and multicellular systems to survive, they must accurately sense and respond to their cellular and extracellular environment. Light is a nearly ubiquitous environmental factor, and many species have evolved the capability to respond to this extracellular stimulus. Numerous photoreceptors underlie the activation of light-sensitive signal(More)
Members of the seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR), or G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), superfamily represent some of the most successful targets of modern drug therapy, with proven efficacy in the treatment of a broad range of human conditions and disease processes. It is now appreciated that β-arrestins, once viewed simply as negative regulators of(More)
Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), commonly referred to as G protein-coupled receptors, form a large part of the "druggable" genome. 7TMRs can signal through parallel pathways simultaneously, such as through heterotrimeric G proteins from different families, or, as more recently appreciated, through the multifunctional adapters, β-arrestins. Biased(More)
The human mind and body respond to stress, a state of perceived threat to homeostasis, by activating the sympathetic nervous system and secreting the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline in the 'fight-or-flight' response. The stress response is generally transient because its accompanying effects (for example, immunosuppression, growth inhibition and(More)
Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, which are also known as seven-transmembrane spanning receptors) by GPCR kinases (GRKs) plays essential roles in the regulation of receptor function by promoting interactions of the receptors with β-arrestins. These multifunctional adaptor proteins desensitize GPCRs, by reducing receptor coupling to G(More)
Determining 3D intermediate structures during the biological action of proteins in real time under ambient conditions is essential for understanding how proteins function. Here we use time-resolved Laue crystallography to extract short-lived intermediate structures and thereby unveil signal transduction in the blue light photoreceptor photoactive yellow(More)
beta-Arrestin-mediated signaling downstream of seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) is a relatively new paradigm for signaling by these receptors. We examined changes in protein phosphorylation occurring when HEK293 cells expressing the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT1aR) were stimulated with the beta-arrestin-biased ligand Sar(1), Ile(4),(More)
Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), also called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the largest class of drug targets, and they can signal through several distinct mechanisms including those mediated by G proteins and the multifunctional adaptor proteins β-arrestins. Moreover, several receptor ligands with differential efficacies toward these(More)