Subimal Datta

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Microinjections of the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate into the cholinergic cell compartment of the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of the rat induces both wakefulness and/or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep depending on the glutamate dosage. However, no studies have systematically recorded the electrical activity of these cells in the freely moving rat(More)
The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the cells in the brain stem pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) are critically involved in the normal regulation of wakefulness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. To test this hypothesis, one of four different doses of the excitatory amino acid L-glutamate (15, 30, 60, and 90 ng) or saline (control(More)
Behavioral studies of learning and memory in both humans and animals support a role for sleep in the consolidation and integration of memories. The present study explored possible physiological mechanisms of sleep-dependent behavioral plasticity by examining the relationship between learning and state-dependent phasic signs of rapid eye movement (REM)(More)
Extensive studies have ascribed a role to the brainstem cholinergic system in the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves. Much of this work stems from systemic and central cholinergic drug administration studies. The brainstem cholinergic system is also implicated in cortical activation via basal forebrain,(More)
At its most basic level, the function of mammalian sleep can be described as a restorative process of the brain and body; recently, however, progressive research has revealed a host of vital functions to which sleep is essential. Although many excellent reviews on sleep behavior have been published, none have incorporated contemporary studies examining the(More)
1. Pontogeniculooccipital (PGO) waves are recorded during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep from the pontine reticular formation. 2. PGO wave-like field potentials can also be recorded in many other parts of the brain in addition to the pontine reticular formation, but their distribution is different in different species. Species differences are due to(More)
Considerable evidence suggests that pedunculopontine tegmental cholinergic cells are critically involved in normal regulation of rapid eye movement sleep. The major excitatory input to the cholinergic cell compartment of the pedunculopontine tegmentum arises from glutamatergic neurons in the pontine reticular formation. Immunohistochemical studies reveal(More)
Glutamate, the neurotransmitter, enhances rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep when microinjected into the brain stem pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of the cat and rat. Glutamate and its various receptors are normally present in the PPT cholinergic cell compartment. The aim of this study was to identify which specific receptor(s) in the cholinergic cell(More)
A number of experimental and theoretical reports have suggested that the ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) wave-generating cells are involved in the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and REM sleep dependent cognitive functions. No studies to date have examined anatomical projections from PGO-generating cells to those brain structures involved in REM(More)
Microinjection of the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate into the brainstem pedunculo pontine tegmentum (PPT) has been shown to induce wakefulness, however, it has been unclear that receptors mediate this effect. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that in the PPT, L-glutamate induces cortical activation and wakefulness via activation of NMDA(More)