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Male seminal fluid proteins induce a profound remodelling of behavioural, physiological and gene signalling pathways in females of many taxa, and typically cause elevated egg production and decreased sexual receptivity. In Drosophila melanogaster, these effects can be mediated by an ejaculate 'sex peptide' (SP), which, in addition, contributes significantly(More)
Sexual conflict is predicted to generate more rapid reproductive isolation between larger populations. While there is some empirical support for this, the data are inconsistent and, additionally, there has been criticism of some of the evidence. Here we reanalyse two experimental-evolution datasets using an isolation index widely applied in the speciation(More)
Conflicts between females and males over reproductive decisions are common . In Drosophila, as in many other organisms, there is often a conflict over how often to mate. The mating frequency that maximizes male reproductive success is higher than that which maximizes female reproductive success . In addition, frequent mating reduces female lifespan and(More)
Postcopulatory sexual selection can select for sperm allocation strategies in males [1, 2], but males should also strategically allocate nonsperm components of the ejaculate [3, 4], such as seminal fluid proteins (Sfps). Sfps can influence the extent of postcopulatory sexual selection [5-7], but little is known of the causes or consequences of quantitative(More)
The interests of males and females over reproduction rarely coincide and conflicts between the sexes over mate choice, mating frequency, reproductive investment, and parental care are common in many taxa. In Drosophila melanogaster, the optimum mating frequency is higher for males than it is for females. Furthermore, females that mate at high frequencies(More)
We assessed the extent to which traits related to ejaculate investment have evolved in lines of Drosophila melanogaster that had an evolutionary history of maintenance at biased sex ratios. Measures of ejaculate investment were made in males that had been maintained at male-biased (MB) and female-biased (FB) adult sex ratios, in which levels of sperm(More)
Female promiscuity can generate postcopulatory competition among males, but it also provides the opportunity for exploitation of rival male ejaculates. For example, in many insect species, male seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) transferred in a female's first mating stimulate increased fecundity and decreased receptivity to remating. Subsequent mates of females(More)
Ejaculates are fundamental to fitness in sexually reproducing animals: males gain all their direct fitness via the ejaculate and females require ejaculates to reproduce. Both sperm and non-sperm components of the ejaculate (including parasperm, seminal proteins, water, and macromolecules) play vital roles in postcopulatory sexual selection and conflict,(More)
Mating rate is a major determinant of female lifespan and fitness, and is predicted to optimize at an intermediate level, beyond which superfluous matings are costly. In female Drosophila melanogaster, nutrition is a key regulator of mating rate but the underlying mechanism is unknown. The evolutionarily conserved insulin/insulin-like growth factor-like(More)
Studies of mating preferences have largely neglected the potential effects of individuals encountering their previous mates ('directly sexually familiar'), or new mates that share similarities to previous mates, e.g. from the same family and/or environment ('phenotypically sexually familiar'). Here, we show that male and female Drosophila melanogaster(More)