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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) is a new time-based method to evaluate upper extremity performance while providing insight into joint-specific and total limb movements. This study addresses selected psychometric attributes of the WMFT applied to a chronic stroke population. METHODS Nineteen individuals after stroke and with(More)
CONTEXT Single-site studies suggest that a 2-week program of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for patients more than 1 year after stroke who maintain some hand and wrist movement can improve upper extremity function that persists for at least 1 year. OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of a 2-week multisite program of CIMT vs usual and customary(More)
To test the clinical counterpart of the learned nonuse theory, 25 chronic hemiplegic stroke and head-injured patients with minimal to moderate upper extremity extensor muscle function were required to keep their uninvolved upper extremities within a hand-enclosed sling during waking hours over a 2-week interval. During this forced use period and for 1 year(More)
There is a lack of consistency among researchers and clinicians in the use of terminology that describes changes in motor ability following neurological injury. Specifically, the terms and definitions of motor compensation and motor recovery have been used in different ways, which is a potential barrier to interdisciplinary communication. This Point of View(More)
OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effects of two exercise approaches, tai chi (TC) and computerized balance training (BT), on specified primary outcomes (biomedical, functional, and psychosocial indicators of frailty) and secondary outcomes (occurrences of fall). DESIGN The Atlanta Frailty and Injuries: Cooperative Studies and Intervention Techniques, a(More)
Arm amputees can experience the perception of movement of a phantom limb while looking at a mirror reflection of the moving, intact arm superimposed on the perceived phantom. Such use of a mirror to provide illusory visual feedback of movement can be useful in rehabilitation of hemiparetic patients. In this case report, we describe the successful(More)
A new therapeutic approach to the rehabilitation of movement after stroke, termed constraint-induced (CI) movement therapy, has been derived from basic research with monkeys given somatosensory deafferentation. CI movement therapy consists of a family of therapies; their common element is that they induce stroke patients to greatly increase the use of an(More)
This article describes the study design, methodological considerations, and demographic characteristics of a phase III RCT to determine if 1) constraint-induced therapy (CI therapy) can be applied with therapeutic success 3 to 9 months after stroke across different sites, 2) gains that might occur persist over 2 years, 3) initial level of motor ability(More)
Despite a threefold increase in treatment interventions studies during the past 10 years, "best practice" for the rehabilitation of the paretic upper limb is still unclear. This review aims to lessen uncertainty in the management of the poststroke upper limb. Two separate searches of the scientific literature from 1966-2001 yielded 333 articles. Three(More)
Computer usage by physical therapists performing clinical research is becoming a reality. In this article, the basic computer operations are discussed with emphasis placed upon the way in which the physical therapist may interact with knowledgeable computer personnel during the formulation and execution of a hypothetical research problem. Some essential(More)