Steven J. Phillips

Learn More
Accurate modeling of geographic distributions of species is crucial to various applications in ecology and conservation. The best performing techniques often require some parameter tuning, which may be prohibitively time-consuming to do separately for each species, or unreliable for small or biased datasets. Additionally, even with the abundance of good(More)
Jane Elith*, Catherine H. Graham*, Robert P. Anderson, Miroslav Dudı́k, Simon Ferrier, Antoine Guisan, Robert J. Hijmans, Falk Huettmann, John R. Leathwick, Anthony Lehmann, Jin Li, Lucia G. Lohmann, Bette A. Loiselle, Glenn Manion, Craig Moritz, Miguel Nakamura, Yoshinori Nakazawa, Jacob McC. Overton, A. Townsend Peterson, Steven J. Phillips, Karen(More)
We study the problem of modeling species geographic distributions, a critical problem in conservation biology. We propose the use of maximum-entropy techniques for this problem, specifically, sequential-update algorithms that can handle a very large number of features. We describe experiments comparing maxent with a standard distribution-modeling tool,(More)
Most methods for modeling species distributions from occurrence records require additional data representing the range of environmental conditions in the modeled region. These data, called background or pseudo-absence data, are usually drawn at random from the entire region, whereas occurrence collection is often spatially biased toward easily accessed(More)
We consider the problem of estimating an unknown probability distribution from samples using the principle of maximum entropy (maxent). To alleviate overfitting with a very large number of features, we propose applying the maxent principle with relaxed constraints on the expectations of the features. By convex duality, this turns out to be equivalent to(More)
Virtually all research in scheduling theory has been concerned with clairvoyant scheduling where it is assumed that the characteristics of a job (in particular, its execution time, release time and dependence on other jobs) are known a priori. This assumption is invalid for scheduling problems that arise in time-sharing operating systems where the scheduler(More)
We investigate the all-pairs shortest paths problem in weighted graphs. We present an algorithm|the Hidden Paths Algorithm|that nds these paths in time O(m n+n 2 log n), where m is the number of edges participating in shortest paths. Our algorithm is a practical substitute for Dijkstra's algorithm. We argue that m is likely to be small in practice, since m(More)
Species responses to climate change may be influenced by changes in available habitat, as well as population processes, species interactions and interactions between demographic and landscape dynamics. Current methods for assessing these responses fail to provide an integrated view of these influences because they deal with habitat change or population(More)
We present a unified and complete account of maximum entropy density estimation subject to constraints represented by convex potential functions or, alternatively, by convex regularization. We provide fully general performance guarantees and an algorithm with a complete convergence proof. As special cases, we easily derive performance guarantees for many(More)