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The National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) is a survey of the prevalence and correlates of mental disorders in the US that was carried out between February 2001 and April 2003. Interviews were administered face-to-face in the homes of respondents, who were selected from a nationally representative multi-stage clustered area probability sample of(More)
Days out of role because of health problems are a major source of lost human capital. We examined the relative importance of commonly occurring physical and mental disorders in accounting for days out of role in 24 countries that participated in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. Face-to-face interviews were carried out(More)
BACKGROUND The proportion of people with mental disorders in treatment is relatively small in low and middle income countries. However, little is known about patterns of recent service use in a country like South Africa. METHODS A nationally representative household survey of 4,351 adult South Africans was carried out. Twelve-month DSM-IV disorders were(More)
As American workers age, workers with impairments and functional limitations make up a larger percentage of our workforce. This investigation presents data from the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement 1994-1995 (NHIS-D) describing the nature of workplace accommodations in the American workforce and factors associated with the provision of(More)
BACKGROUND The methodology commonly used to estimate disease burden, featuring ratings of severity of individual conditions, has been criticized for ignoring co-morbidity. A methodology that addresses this problem is proposed and illustrated here with data from the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys. Although the analysis is based on(More)
Using the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement of 1994 to 1995, we examined the factors associated with employment among Americans with disabilities. Persons with disabilities who were more educated were more likely to be working. Married men were more likely to work than unmarried men (odds ratio [OR], 1.58). Blacks were less likely to(More)
OBJECTIVE Two lower-extremity diseases (LEDs), including peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease (PVD), are leading causes of disability in the U.S. Although LEDs can be complications of diabetes, their prevelances and risk factors apart from diabetes are poorly described. This study describes the prevalence of LEDs and examines the(More)
INTRODUCTION We used cognitive and psychometric modeling techniques to evaluate the construct validity and measurement precision of latent cognitive abilities measured by a test of concept identification learning: the Penn Conditional Exclusion Test (PCET). METHOD Item response theory parameters were embedded within classic associative- and(More)