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Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in humans caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat that produces choreic movements, which are preceded by cognitive deficits. The HD transgenic rat (tgHD), which contains the human HD mutation with a 51 CAG repeat allele, exhibits motor deficits that begin when these rats are 12 months of(More)
Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat on the short arm of chromosome 4 resulting in cognitive decline, motor dysfunction, and death, typically occurring 15 to 20 years after the onset of motor symptoms. Neuropathologically, HD is characterized by a specific loss of medium spiny neurons in the caudate(More)
Stem cells have gained significant interest as a potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD). One source of these cells is adult neural stem cells (aNSCs), which differentiate easily into neuronal lineages. However, these cells are vulnerable to immune responses following transplantation. Another source is(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than five million Americans and is characterized by a progressive loss of memory, loss of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and an increase in oxidative stress. Recent studies indicate that dietary(More)
PURPOSE Stroke is the third leading cause of death and permanent disability in the United States, often producing long-term cognitive impairments, which are not easily recapitulated in animal models. The goals of this study were to assess whether: (1) the endothelin-1 (ET-1) model of chronic stroke produced discernable cognitive deficits; (2) a spatial(More)
Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat (greater than 38) on the short arm of chromosome 4, resulting in loss and dysfunction of neurons in the neostriatum and cortex, leading to cognitive decline, motor dysfunction, and death, typically occurring 15 to 20 years after the onset of motor symptoms. Although(More)
Exposure to chronic stress often elevates basal circulating glucocorticoids during the circadian nadir and leads to exaggerated glucocorticoid production following exposure to subsequent stressors. While glucocorticoid production is primarily mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, there is evidence that the sympathetic nervous system can(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive loss of memory and other cognitive disturbances. The neuropathology of AD includes the major hallmarks of toxic amyloid-β oligomer accumulation and neurofibrillary tangles, as well as increased oxidative stress, cholinergic dysfunction, synapse loss, changes in endogenous neurotrophic factors, and(More)
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