Stephen M. Belkoff

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Acrylic cements have been used for the augmentation of weakened or partially destroyed bones for decades (1). The term vertebroplasty originally described an open surgical procedure that introduces bone graft or acrylic cement to mechanically augment weakened vertebral bodies. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is the acrylic most commonly used as a bone filler,(More)
STUDY DESIGN Ex vivo biomechanical study using osteoporotic cadaveric vertebral bodies. OBJECTIVES To determine if the inflatable bone tamp (tamp) restores height to compressed vertebral bodies and to compare the biomechanical properties of isolated, fractured osteoporotic vertebral bodies treated by kyphoplasty (tamp) or vertebroplasty. SUMMARY OF(More)
PURPOSE Despite the high long-term success rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions, 8% of patients undergoing this primary procedure have recurrent disability and graft failure. Nonanatomic tunnel positioning (primarily of the femoral tunnel) accounts for most of all technical failures. We hypothesized that reconstructions that closely(More)
Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), whereby polymethylmethacrylate cement is injected into the vertebral body (VB), has been used to successfully treat various spinal lesions. The mechanism responsible for the palliative effect of PVP is unknown, but it may be the result of neural damage caused by heat liberated during polymerization of the(More)
STUDY DESIGN Ex vivo biomechanical study using osteoporotic cadaveric vertebral bodies. OBJECTIVE To determine the association between the volume of cement injected during percutaneous vertebroplasty and the restoration of strength and stiffness in osteoporotic vertebral bodies, two investigational cements were studied: Orthocomp (Orthovita, Malvern, PA)(More)
STUDY DESIGN Comparative ex vivobiomechanical study. OBJECTIVES To determine the strength and stiffness of osteoporotic vertebral bodies subjected to compression fractures and subsequently stabilized via bipedicular injection of one of two bone cements: one is a commercially available polymethylmethacrylate (Simplex P) and one is a proprietary(More)
The purpose of the current study was to measure the material properties of various cements prepared per manufacturers' recommendations and of cements modified according to compositions developed by clinicians with experience performing vertebroplasty. Cement was prepared, cast to form cylindrical specimens, and tested in compression. The optical density of(More)
STUDY DESIGN Cadaveric study on the biomechanics of osteoporotic vertebral bodies augmented and not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement. OBJECTIVES To determine the strength and stiffness of osteoporotic vertebral bodies subjected to compression fractures and 1) not augmented, 2) augmented with unipedicular injection of cement, or 3) augmented(More)
STUDY DESIGN Ex vivo biomechanical study. OBJECTIVES To compare the biomechanical properties of isolated, fractured, osteoporotic vertebral bodies after treatment by kyphoplasty with one of two cements: alpha-tri-calcium phosphate cement (Biopex-R; Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo, Japan) or polymethylmethacrylate (Simplex P; Stryker-Howmedica-Osteonics,(More)
BACKGROUND Flexible suture-button devices are used to stabilize the distal tibiofibular joint after syndesmotic rupture, but little is known about how they affect fibular motion during cyclic physiological loading. This study examined how much fibular motion occurs during cyclic loading of ankles repaired with suture-buttons or screws relative to one with(More)