Learn More
The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint(More)
OBJECTIVE There is a dearth of long-term data regarding patient and limb survival in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). The purpose of our study was therefore to prospectively investigate the limb and person survival of DFU patients during a follow-up period of more than 10 years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Two hundred forty-seven patients with(More)
OBJECTIVE To estimate the impact of diabetes on mortality in patients after first major lower extremity amputation (LEA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using claims data of a nationwide statutory health insurance, we assessed all deaths in a cohort of all 444 patients with a first major LEA since 2005 (71.8% male; mean age 69.1 years; 58.3% diabetic; 43%(More)
OBJECTIVE To estimate the impact of diabetes on mortality in patients after first stroke event. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using claims data from a nationwide statutory health insurance fund (Gmünder ErsatzKasse), we assessed all deaths in a cohort of 5,757 patients with a first stroke between 2005 and 2007 (69.3% male, mean age 68.1 years, 32.2% with(More)
W e very much appreciate the article by Dr. Bernstein regarding callus debridement and, in fact, agree with him in that calluses and their treatment are not trivial affairs in the patient with diabetes, neuropathy, and peripheral artery disease (1). Just as we have all seen devastating consequences with coumadin therapy or colitis caused by antibiotic(More)
The diabetic foot is a lifelong disease. The longer patients with diabetes and foot ulcers are observed, the higher the likelihood that they will develop comorbidities that adversely influence ulcer recurrence, amputation and survival (for example peripheral arterial disease, renal failure or ischaemic heart disease). The purpose of our study was to(More)
BACKGROUND Diabetic individuals have a largely increased risk of lower extremity amputation (LEA) compared with non-diabetic patients. Prior systematic reviews of incidence of LEA have some limitations with respect to lack of consensus in the definition of LEA, level of LEA (all, major, minor), and definition of source population (general population or(More)
  • 1