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The ability of HIV-1 to use dendritic cells (DCs) for transport and to transfer virus to activated T cells in the lymph node may be crucial in early HIV-1 pathogenesis. We have characterized primary DCs for the receptors involved in viral envelope attachment and observed that C-type lectin receptor (CLR) binding was predominant in skin DCs, whereas binding(More)
Ebola virus exhibits a broad cellular tropism in vitro. In humans and animal models, virus is found in most tissues and organs during the latter stages of infection. In contrast, a more restricted cell and tissue tropism is exhibited early in infection where macrophages, liver, lymph node, and spleen are major initial targets. This indicates that cellular(More)
The snake venom rhodocytin has been reported to bind to integrin alpha2beta1 and glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha on platelets, but it is also able to induce activation independent of the 2 receptors and of GPVI. Using rhodocytin affinity chromatography, we have identified a novel C-type lectin receptor, CLEC-2, in platelets that confers signaling responses to(More)
DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR are two closely related membrane-associated C-type lectins that bind human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein with high affinity. Binding of HIV to cells expressing DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR can enhance the efficiency of infection of cells coexpressing the specific HIV receptors. DC-SIGN is expressed on some dendritic cells,(More)
DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs), efficiently binds and transmits HIVs and simian immunodeficiency viruses to susceptible cells in trans. A DC-SIGN homologue, termed DC-SIGNR, has recently been described. Herein we show that DC-SIGNR, like DC-SIGN, can bind to multiple strains of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian(More)
The two lectin receptors, CLEC-2 and Dectin-1, have been shown to signal through a Syk-dependent pathway, despite the presence of only a single YXXL in their cytosolic tails. In this study, we show that stimulation of CLEC-2 in platelets and in two mutant cell lines is dependent on the YXXL motif and on proteins that participate in signaling by(More)
The lectins DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR can augment viral infection; however, the range of pathogens interacting with these attachment factors is incompletely defined. Here we show that DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR enhance infection mediated by the glycoprotein (GP) of Marburg virus (MARV) and the S protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and might(More)
Platelets can engulf human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and a significant amount of HIV-1 in the blood of infected individuals is associated with these cells. However, it is unclear how platelets capture HIV-1 and whether platelet-associated virus remains infectious. DC-SIGN and other lectins contribute to capture of HIV-1 by dendritic cells (DCs)(More)
A variety of molecules in human blood have been implicated in the inhibition of HIV-1. However, it remained elusive which circulating natural compounds are most effective in controlling viral replication in vivo. To identify natural HIV-1 inhibitors we screened a comprehensive peptide library generated from human hemofiltrate. The most potent fraction(More)
LSECtin is a member of the C-type lectin family of glycan-binding receptors that is expressed on sinusoidal endothelial cells of the liver and lymph nodes. To compare the sugar and pathogen binding properties of LSECtin with those of related but more extensively characterized receptors, such as DC-SIGN, a soluble fragment of LSECtin consisting of the(More)