Stefan Pöhlmann

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DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR are two closely related membrane-associated C-type lectins that bind human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein with high affinity. Binding of HIV to cells expressing DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR can enhance the efficiency of infection of cells coexpressing the specific HIV receptors. DC-SIGN is expressed on some dendritic cells,(More)
The lectins DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR can augment viral infection; however, the range of pathogens interacting with these attachment factors is incompletely defined. Here we show that DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR enhance infection mediated by the glycoprotein (GP) of Marburg virus (MARV) and the S protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and might(More)
The ability of HIV-1 to use dendritic cells (DCs) for transport and to transfer virus to activated T cells in the lymph node may be crucial in early HIV-1 pathogenesis. We have characterized primary DCs for the receptors involved in viral envelope attachment and observed that C-type lectin receptor (CLR) binding was predominant in skin DCs, whereas binding(More)
The snake venom rhodocytin has been reported to bind to integrin alpha2beta1 and glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha on platelets, but it is also able to induce activation independent of the 2 receptors and of GPVI. Using rhodocytin affinity chromatography, we have identified a novel C-type lectin receptor, CLEC-2, in platelets that confers signaling responses to(More)
A variety of molecules in human blood have been implicated in the inhibition of HIV-1. However, it remained elusive which circulating natural compounds are most effective in controlling viral replication in vivo. To identify natural HIV-1 inhibitors we screened a comprehensive peptide library generated from human hemofiltrate. The most potent fraction(More)
DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs), efficiently binds and transmits HIVs and simian immunodeficiency viruses to susceptible cells in trans. A DC-SIGN homologue, termed DC-SIGNR, has recently been described. Herein we show that DC-SIGNR, like DC-SIGN, can bind to multiple strains of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian(More)
Ebola virus exhibits a broad cellular tropism in vitro. In humans and animal models, virus is found in most tissues and organs during the latter stages of infection. In contrast, a more restricted cell and tissue tropism is exhibited early in infection where macrophages, liver, lymph node, and spleen are major initial targets. This indicates that cellular(More)
The C-type lectins DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR [collectively referred to as DC-SIGN(R)] bind and transmit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus to T cells via the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Other viruses containing heavily glycosylated glycoproteins (GPs) fail to interact with DC-SIGN(R), suggesting some degree of specificity(More)
Dendritic cells (DCs) efficiently bind and transmit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to cocultured T cells and so may play an important role in HIV transmission. DC-SIGN, a novel C-type lectin that is expressed in DCs, has recently been shown to bind R5 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) strains and a laboratory-adapted X4 strain. To characterize the interaction of(More)
The C-type lectins DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR efficiently bind human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains and can transmit bound virus to adjacent CD4-positive cells. DC-SIGN also binds efficiently to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, enhancing Ebola virus infection. DC-SIGN is thought to be responsible for the ability of(More)