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The Black-legged Kittiwake Rissa tridactyla is the most abundant gull species in the world, but some populations have declined in recent years, apparently due to food shortage. Kittiwakes are surface feeders and thus can compensate for low food availability only by increasing their foraging range and/or devoting more time to foraging. The species is widely(More)
Identification of Area-restricted search (ARS) behaviour is used to better understand foraging movements and strategies of marine predators. Track-based descriptive analyses are commonly used to detect ARS behaviour, but they may be biased by factors such as foraging trip duration or non-foraging behaviours (i.e. resting on the water). Using first-passage(More)
Animal tracking provides new means to assess far-reaching environmental impacts. In the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, a long-distance migrant, the northern gannet (Morus bassanus) suffered the highest oiling among beach-wrecked birds recovered. Analysis of bird-borne tracking data indicated that 25 per cent of their(More)
Breeding seabirds are central-place foragers and therefore exploit food resources most intensively nearer their colonies. When nesting aggregations are close to one another density-dependent competition is likely to be high, potentially promoting foraging segregation (i.e. neighbouring colonies may segregate to search for food in different areas). However,(More)
We compared several large marine ecosystems in terms of species numbers of fishes, sea birds, marine mammals, and cephalopods. We examined how these numbers were distributed by trophic level, from her-bivores to top predators. We created group-specific trophic signatures as plots of number of species by trophic level, and used these to identify similarities(More)
Lesser black-backed gulls Larus fuscus are considered to be mainly pelagic. We assessed the importance of different landscape elements (open sea, tidal flats and inland) by comparing marine and terrestrial foraging behaviours in lesser black-backed gulls breeding along the coast of the southern North Sea. We attached GPS data loggers to eight incubating(More)
Reducing resource competition is a crucial requirement for colonial seabirds to ensure adequate self- and chick-provisioning during breeding season. Spatial segregation is a common avoidance strategy among and within species from neighboring breeding colonies. We determined whether the foraging behaviors of incubating lesser black-backed gulls (Larus(More)
A fundamental study by Ens et al. (1992, Journal of Animal Ecology, 61, 703) developed the concept of two different nest-territory qualities in Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus, L.), resulting in different reproductive successes. "Resident" oystercatchers use breeding territories close to the high-tide line and occupy adjacent foraging(More)
The Wadden Sea is an important resting site on the East Atlantic Flyway for Eurasian Curlews (Numenius arquata). However, there is currently little information regarding the connectivity between breeding, staging, and over-wintering sites. We equipped four Curlews with GPS-data loggers and recorded their migration patterns during 2014–2015. Curlews left the(More)
We studied the impact of offshore wind farms on the distribution of Northern Gannets in the southern North Sea. Distributions were derived from ship-based and aerial-transect counts, and from global positioning system (GPS) tracking of chick-rearing adults from the colony on Helgoland. Foraging trips of tagged Gannets lasted from 0.4 to 53.5 h, with a total(More)