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Cystinosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disease characterized by defective transport of cystine out of lysosomes. However, the causative gene, CTNS, encodes a seven transmembrane domain lysosomal protein, cystinosin, unrelated to known transporters. To investigate the molecular function of cystinosin, the protein was redirected from lysosomes to the(More)
Infantile nephropathic cystinosis is a rare, autosomal recessive disease caused by a defect in the transport of cystine across the lysosomal membrane and characterized by early onset of renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Late-onset cystinosis, a rarer form of the disorder, is characterized by onset of symptoms between 12 and 15 years of age. We previously(More)
Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by accumulation of intralysosomal cystine and is caused by a defect in the transport of cystine across the lysosomal membrane. Using a positional cloning strategy, we recently cloned the causative gene, CTNS, and identified pathogenic mutations, including deletions, that span(More)
Cystinosis is an inherited disorder due to mutations in the CTNS gene which encodes cystinosin, a lysosomal transmembrane protein involved in cystine export to the cytosol. Both accumulation of cystine in the lysosome and decreased cystine in the cytosol may participate in the pathogenic mechanism underlying the disease. We observed that cystinotic cell(More)
Nephropathic cystinosis, an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine, is the most common inherited cause of renal Fanconi syndrome. The cystinosis gene has been mapped to chromosome 17p13. We found that the locus D17S829 was homozygously deleted in 23 out of 70 patients, and identified a novel gene, CTNS, which(More)
Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an accumulation of intralysosomal cystine. The causative gene, CTNS, encodes cystinosin, a seven-transmembrane-domain protein, which we recently showed to be a lysosomal cystine transporter. The most severe and frequent form of cystinosis, the infantile form, appears around 6 to 12 months, with(More)
Cystinosis is a lysosomal transport disorder characterized by an accumulation of intra-lysosomal cystine. Biochemical studies showed that the lysosomal cystine transporter was distinct from the plasma membrane cystine transporters and that it exclusively transported cystine. The gene underlying cystinosis, CTNS, encodes a predicted seven-transmembrane(More)
Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease that belongs to the family of lysosomal storage disorders. The defective gene is CTNS encoding the lysosomal cystine transporter, cystinosin. Cystine accumulates in every organ in the body and leads to organ damage and dysfunction, including renal defects. Using the murine model for cystinosis,(More)
Cystinosis is an inherited disorder characterized by defective lysosomal efflux of cystine. Three clinical forms (infantile, juvenile and ocular cystinosis) have been described according to the age of onset and severity of the symptoms. The causative gene, CTNS, encodes a seven transmembrane domain protein, cystinosin, which we recently identified as a(More)
Cystinosis as a clinical entity is a progressive dysfunction of multiple organs caused by the accumulation of cystine in the tissues, leading, for example, to end-stage renal failure, diabetes, hypothyroidism, myopathy, and central nervous system deterioration. Brodin-Sartorius and colleagues present a long-term study on the impact of cysteamine therapy on(More)