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Ad hoc networks rely on the cooperation of the nodes participating in the network to forward packets for each other. A node may decide not to cooperate to save its resources while still using the network to relay its traffic. If too many nodes exhibit this behavior, network performance degrades and cooperating nodes may find themselves unfairly loaded. Most(More)
This paper presents the initial design and performance study of MACA-P, a RTS/CTS based MAC protocol that enables simultaneous transmissions in multi-hop ad-hoc wireless networks. Providing such low-cost multi-hop and high performance wireless access networks is an important enabler of pervasive computing. MACA-P is a set of enhancements to the 802.11 DCF(More)
A router in wired network typically requires multiple network interfaces to act as a router or a forwarding node. In an ad-hoc multi-hop wireless network on the other hand, any node with a wireless network interface card can operate as a router or a forwarding node, since it can receive a packet from a neighboring node, do a route lookup based on the(More)
This paper presents the detailed design and performance analysis of MACA-P, a RTS/CTS based MAC protocol, that enables simultaneous transmissions in wireless mesh networks. The IEEE 802.11 DCF MAC prohibits any parallel transmission in the neighborhood of either a sender or a receiver (of an ongoing transmission). MACA-P is a set of enhancements to the(More)
Ahwrrrcr— We study the performance metrics associated with TCP-regulated traffic in multi-hop, wireless networks that use a cnmmnn physical channel (e.g., IEEE 802.11). In contrast to earlier analyses, we focus simultaneously on two key operating metrics-the energy efficiency and the session throughput. Using analysis and simulations, we show how these(More)
The concept of a forwarding node, which receives packets from upstream nodes and then transmits these packets to downstream nodes, is a key element of any multi-hop network, wired or wireless. While high-speed IP router architectures have been extensively studied for wired networks, the concept of a " wireless IP router " has not been addressed so far. In(More)
— An interesting feature of IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN cards is that they support multiple transmission modes. For example, the 802.11b cards support four transmission modes of 1, 2, 5.5 and 11 Mbps, whereas, the 802.11a cards support eight transmission modes, upto a maximum of 54 Mbps. In this paper, we study layer four protocols over multi-rate multi-hop(More)