Sophie Bohnet

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To understand the mechanism of cell migration, one needs to know how the parts of the motile machinery of the cell are assembled and how they move with respect to each other. Actin and myosin II are thought to be the major structural and force-generating components of this machinery (Mitchison and Cramer, 1996; Parent, 2004). The movement of myosin II along(More)
Actin assembly at the leading edge of the cell is believed to drive protrusion, whereas membrane resistance and contractile forces result in retrograde flow of the assembled actin network away from the edge. Thus, cell motion and shape changes are expected to depend on the balance of actin assembly and retrograde flow. This idea, however, has been(More)
Protrusion, the first step of cell migration, is driven by actin polymerization coupled to adhesion at the cell's leading edge. Polymerization and adhesive forces have been estimated, but the net protrusion force has not been measured accurately. We arrest the leading edge of a moving fish keratocyte with a hydrodynamic load generated by a fluid flow from a(More)
To understand the mechanism of cell migration, one needs to know how the parts of the motile machinery of the cell are assembled and how they move with respect to each other. Actin and myosin II are thought to be the major structural and force-generating components of this machinery (Mitchison and Cramer, 1996; Parent, 2004). The movement of myosin II along(More)
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