Simcha Srebnik

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Biopolymers adsorb on cell and virus surfaces with great specificity. Recently, theoretical and computational studies have inquired as to whether there are any universal design strategies that nature employs in order to affect such recognition. Specifically, the efficacy of multifunctionality and quenched disorder as essential design strategies has been(More)
The importance of hydrophobic interactions in determining polymer adsorption and wrapping of carbon nanotubes is still under debate. In this work, we concentrate on the effect of short-ranged weakly attractive hydrophobic interactions between polymers and nanotubes (modeled as an infinitely long and smooth cylindrical surface), neglecting all other(More)
Molecular imprinting is an established method for the creation of artificial recognition sites in synthetic materials through polymerization and cross-linking in the presence of template molecules. Removal of the templates leaves cavities that are complementary to the template molecules in size, shape, and functionality. In recent years, various theoretical(More)
Alginate readily aggregates and forms a physical gel in the presence of cations. The association of the chains, and ultimately gel structure and mechanics, depends not only on ion type, but also on the sequence and composition of the alginate chain that ultimately determines its stiffness. Chain flexibility is generally believed to decrease with guluronic(More)
A coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation is used to study thermal denaturation of small proteins in an infinitely dilute solution and adsorbed on a flat hydrophobic surface. Intermolecular interactions are modeled using the Miyazawa-Jernigan (MJ) knowledge-based potential for implicit solvent with the BULDG hydrophobicity scale. We analyze the thermal(More)
Molecular imprinting is an established method for the creation of artificial recognition sites in synthetic materials through polymerization and cross-linking in the presence of template molecules. Removal of the templates leaves cavities that are complementary to the template molecules in size, shape, and functionality. Although this technique is effective(More)
Two-dimensional mean-field lattice theory is used to model immobilization and stabilization of an enzyme on a hydrophobic surface using grafted polymers. Although the enzyme affords biofunctionality, the grafted polymers stabilize the enzyme and impart biocompatibility. The protein is modeled as a compact hydrophobic-polar polymer, designed to have a(More)
Molecular imprinting has been extensively studied and applied as a simple technique for creating artificial polymer-based recognition gels for a target molecule. Although this technique is effective when targeting small molecules, attempts to extend it to larger templates, such as proteins, have, for the most part, failed to show similar success. Our group(More)
Molecular imprinting allows the creation of artificial recognition sites in synthetic materials through polymerization and cross-linking in the presence of template molecules. Removal of the templates leaves cavities that are complementary to the template molecules in size, shape, and functionality. Although this technique is effective when targeting small(More)
We introduce a two-dimensional lattice model of immobilization and stabilization of proteinlike polymers using grafted polymers. The protein is designed to have a specific bulk conformation reproducing a catalytic cleft of natural enzymes. Our model predicts a first order denaturing adsorption transition of free proteins. On the other hand, for an(More)