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Accumulating evidence indicates that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) exerts a crucial role in aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely obscure. Results from Tsc1- or Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and human cancer cell lines consistently indicate that the expression of glucose transporter 3(More)
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), caused by loss-of-function mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, is characterized by benign tumor formation in multiple organs. Hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is the primary alteration underlying TSC tumors. By analyzing Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and rat uterine(More)
From the bark of Chinese Myrica rubra (Myricaceae) two novel compounds, myricarborin A and n-butyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside, have been isolated along with (+)-S- myricanol, (-)-R- myricanol 5-O-beta-D-(6'-O-galloyl)-glucopyanoside and n-butyl-beta-D-fructopyranoside. The structures of the novel compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods.
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), caused by loss-of-function mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by benign tumor formation in multiple organs. Hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is the primary alteration underlying TSC tumor. Thus, rapamycin, as an mTOR specific inhibitor, has been assumed(More)
Hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), caused by loss-of-function mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, leads to the development of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a benign tumor syndrome with multiple affected organs. mTORC1-mediated inhibition of AKT constrains the tumor progression of TSC, but the exact mechanisms(More)
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder featured with multi-organ benign tumours. Disruption of TSC1/TSC2 complex suppression on mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling causes TSC. Hyperactive mTOR-mediated negative feedback regulation of AKT partially contributes to the benign nature of TSC-associated(More)
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