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Efficient and accurate protein localization is essential to cells and requires protein-targeting machineries to both effectively capture the cargo in the cytosol and productively unload the cargo at the membrane. To understand how these challenges are met, we followed the interaction of translating ribosomes during their targeting by the signal recognition(More)
The signal recognition particle (SRP) mediates the cotranslational targeting of nascent proteins to the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum membrane or the bacterial plasma membrane. During this process, two GTPases, one in SRP and one in the SRP receptor (named Ffh and FtsY in bacteria, respectively), form a complex in which both proteins reciprocally(More)
The modular SCF (Skp1, cullin, and F box) ubiquitin ligases feature a large family of F box protein substrate receptors that enable recognition of diverse targets. However, how the repertoire of SCF complexes is sustained remains unclear. Real-time measurements of formation and disassembly indicate that SCF(Fbxw7) is extraordinarily stable, but, in the(More)
During cotranslational protein targeting, two guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) in the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) form a unique complex in which hydrolyses of both guanosine triphosphates (GTP) are activated in a shared active site. It was thought that GTP hydrolysis drives the recycling of SRP and SR, but is not crucial for(More)
The signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor comprise the major cellular machinery that mediates the cotranslational targeting of proteins to cellular membranes. It remains unclear how the delivery of cargos to the target membrane is spatially coordinated. We show here that phospholipid binding drives important conformational rearrangements that(More)
The signal recognition particle (SRP) mediates the co-translational targeting of nascent proteins to the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum membrane, or the bacterial plasma membrane. During this process, two GTPases, one in the SRP and one in the SRP receptor (SR), form a complex in which both proteins reciprocally activate the GTPase reaction of one(More)
Approximately one-third of the proteome is initially destined for the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum or the bacterial plasma membrane. The proper localization of these proteins is mediated by a universally conserved protein-targeting machinery, the signal recognition particle (SRP), which recognizes ribosomes carrying signal sequences and, through(More)
Conformational changes are often required for the biological function of RNA molecules. In the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme reaction, a conformational change has been suggested to occur upon binding of the oligonucleotide substrate (S) or the guanosine nucleophile (G), leading to stronger binding of the second substrate. Recent work showed that the two(More)
The signal recognition particle (SRP), which mediates cotranslational protein targeting to cellular membranes, is universally conserved and essential for bacterial and mammalian cells. However, the current understanding of the role of SRP in cell physiology and pathology is still poor, and the reasons behind its essential role in cell survival remain(More)
Membrane proteins impose enormous challenges to cellular protein homeostasis during their post-translational targeting, and they require chaperones to keep them soluble and translocation competent. Here we show that a novel targeting factor in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP), cpSRP43, is a highly specific molecular chaperone that(More)