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Decreasing power consumption is the key design issue of SSDs. A typical SSD consists of more than 16 NAND Flash memories, DRAMs and a NAND controller. Since the NAND write performance is 10MB/s [1,2], to raise the write speed of SSD to the level of HDD, 100MB/s, 8 or more NAND chips in SSD are simultaneously programmed. As the feature size decreases, the(More)
This paper investigates the effect of the TSV resistance (R TSV) on the performance of boost converters for Solid State Drive (SSD) using circuit simulation. When R TSV is 0Ω, both the rising time (t rise) from 0V to 15V and the energy during boosting (E loss) of the output voltage (V OUT) are 10.6% and 6.6% of the conventional charge pump respectively. In(More)
A 3D-integrated Solid State Drive (SSD) with the boost converter can achieve both the low power and the fast write-operation at the small die area of the NAND flash memory. The performance of the boost converter, however, is critically affected by the inductor, because the output voltage of the boost converter, the rising time, and the energy consumption(More)
—In this paper we present an adaptive program-voltage generator for 3D-integrated solid state drives (SSDs) based on a boost converter. The converter consists of a spiral inductor, a high-voltage MOS circuit, and an adaptive-frequency and duty-cycle (AFD) controller. The spiral inductor requires an area of only 5 5 mm in an interposer. The high-voltage MOS(More)
SUMMARY Two essential technologies for a 3D Solid State Drive (3D-SSD) with a boost converter are presented in this paper. The first topic is the spiral inductor design which determines the performance of the boost converter, and the second is the effect of TSV's on the boost converter. These techniques are very important in achieving a 3D-SSD with a boost(More)
The L-type Ca2+ channel has a unique kinetic property known as voltage-dependent facilitation. Many researchers have repeatedly investigated the mechanism in response to the voltage-dependent facilitation since the first observation by Fenwick et al. in 1982. Electrophysiological evaluations of voltage-dependent facilitation, however, remain inconsistent,(More)
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