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Excessive synchronization of the basal ganglia neuronal activity in the 13- to 35-Hz frequency band, so-called beta activity, has been associated with the motor deficits of Parkinson's disease (PD). Studies have demonstrated that beta activity may be suppressed by treatment with dopaminergic medication and high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic(More)
Chronic high frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia is a highly effective treatment for Parkinson's Disease (PD). Such deep brain stimulation is thought to suppress spontaneous, including pathological, activity in the basal ganglia [1–5]. Equally, however, it must also remove any residual physiological functioning in(More)
Excessive synchronization of neuronal activity at around 20 Hz is a common finding in the basal ganglia of patients with untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). Correlative evidence suggests, but does not prove, that this spontaneous activity may contribute to slowness of movement in this condition. Here we investigate whether externally imposed synchronization(More)
Excessive synchronization of basal ganglia neural activity at low frequencies is considered a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, few studies have unambiguously linked this activity to movement impairment through direct stimulation of basal ganglia targets at low frequency. Furthermore, these studies have varied in their methodology and findings,(More)
Excessive synchronization of basal ganglia neuronal activity at ~20 Hz is characteristic of patients with untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). Correlative evidence suggests that this activity may contribute to bradykinesia. Attempts to demonstrate causality through stimulation imposed synchronization at 20 Hz in the region of the subthalamic nucleus (STN)(More)
The aim of this study is to establish whether tracheobronchial cytology is useful in the diagnosis of inhalation injury. Twenty patients diagnosed to have inhalation injury by existing clinical criteria and 20 control patients were admitted into the study. Bronchoscopy and brush biopsies were carried out. They were then scored using a Total Cellular Score(More)
A 55-year-old man with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented with intractable headaches and intermittent rhinorrhoea for 2 weeks. CT showed severe destruction of the skull base by the tumour. The headache persisted despite intraventricular morphine. On the 29th hospital day, sudden onset of neurological deterioration led to coma, and CT revealed(More)