Sheila C. Barton

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Germ cell fate in mice is induced in pluripotent epiblast cells in response to signals from extraembryonic tissues. The specification of approximately 40 founder primordial germ cells and their segregation from somatic neighbours are important events in early development. We have proposed that a critical event during this specification includes repression(More)
Germ cell fate in mice is induced in proximal epiblast cells by the extra-embryonic ectoderm, and is not acquired through the inheritance of any preformed germ plasm. To determine precisely how germ cells are specified, we performed a genetic screen between single nascent germ cells and their somatic neighbours that share common ancestry. Here we show that(More)
The earliest cell fate decision in the mammalian embryo separates the extra-embryonic trophoblast lineage, which forms the fetal portion of the placenta, from the embryonic cell lineages. The body plan of the embryo proper is established only later at gastrulation, when the pluripotent epiblast gives rise to the germ layers ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm.(More)
Imprinted genes display parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic expression that apparently regulates complex mammalian traits, including growth and behavior. The Peg3 gene is expressed in embryos and the adult brain from the paternal allele only. A mutation in the Peg3 gene resulted in growth retardation, as well as a striking impairment of maternal behavior(More)
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in diverse cellular processes, but little is known about their identity and functions during early mammalian development. Here, we show the effects of the loss of maternal inheritance of miRNAs following specific deletion of Dicer from growing oocytes. The mutant mature oocytes were almost entirely depleted of all(More)
 Expression of imprinted genes is dependent on their parental origin. This is reflected in the heritable differential methylation of parental alleles. The gametic imprints are however reversible as they do not endure for more than one generation. To investigate if the epigenetic changes in male and female germ line are similar or not, we derived embryonic(More)
Mest (also known as Peg1), an imprinted gene expressed only from the paternal allele during development, was disrupted by gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The targeted mutation is imprinted and reversibly silenced by passage through the female germ line. Paternal transmission activates the targeted allele and causes embryonic growth retardation(More)
It has been suggested that the failure of parthenogenetic mouse embryos to develop to term is primarily due to their aberrant cytoplasm and homozygosity leading to the expression of recessive lethal genes. The reported birth of homozygous gynogenetic (male pronucleus removed from egg after fertilization) mice and of animals following transplantation of(More)
Polycomb-group (Pc-G) genes are required for the stable repression of the homeotic selector genes and other developmentally regulated genes, presumably through the modulation of chromatin domains. Among the Drosophila Pc-G genes, Enhancer of zeste [E(z)] merits special consideration since it represents one of the Pc-G genes most conserved through evolution.(More)
stella is a novel gene specifically expressed in primordial germ cells, oocytes, preimplantation embryos, and pluripotent cells. It encodes a protein with a SAP-like domain and a splicing factor motif-like structure, suggesting possible roles in chromosomal organization or RNA processing. Here, we have investigated the effects of a targeted mutation of(More)